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Can you estimate body composition in dogs from photographs?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Veterinary Research, January 2016
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

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6 X users
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84 Mendeley
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Title
Can you estimate body composition in dogs from photographs?
Published in
BMC Veterinary Research, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12917-016-0642-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Poppy Gant, Shelley L. Holden, Vincent Biourge, Alexander J. German

Abstract

A validated method for assessing the visual characteristics of body condition from photographs (vBCS), would be a useful initial screening tool for client-owned dogs. In this retrospective study, photographs taken before and after weight loss from 155 overweight and obese dogs attending a weight management referral clinic were used in designing and testing the feasibility of vBCS. Observers with a range of experience examined the photographs, and estimated body condition indirectly (vBCS) using three different methods. In the first method (vBCSmeasured), the ratio of abdominal width to thoracic width (A:T) was measured, and cut-points used to determine body condition; the second method (iBCSsubjective) involved semi-quantitative examination using visual descriptors of BCS; the third (vBCSadjusted) was a combined approach whereby A:T ratio was first determined, and the final score modified if necessary after assessing photographs. When an experienced observer performed vBCS, there were moderate-to-good associations between body fat (measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) and the three vBCS methods (median Rs: 0.51-0.75; P < 0.001), and also moderate-to-substantial agreement with actual BCS (median kappa 0.51-0.63; P < 0.001). For operators with a range of experience, moderate-to-substantial agreement was generally seen between actual BCS and the scores determined by all three methods (median Kappa 0.55-0.70, P < 0.001), but the strength of agreement varied amongst observers. Age, sex, breed, coat length, and coat colour had no significant effect on vBCS (P > 0.05 for all). Compared with ideal weight and obese dogs, errors in assessing body condition were more common for overweight dogs (e.g. BCS 6-7/9, P < 0.001) by vBCSadjusted (P = 0.008), and vBCSsubjective (P = 0.021), but not by vBCSmeasured (P = 0.150). For vBCSadjusted, body condition was most often overestimated whilst, for vBCSsubjective, body condition was most often under-estimated. An estimate of body condition can be obtained from an indirect assessment of photographs, but performance varies amongst observers.

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X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 84 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Austria 1 1%
Unknown 83 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 14 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 12%
Researcher 10 12%
Student > Master 9 11%
Other 6 7%
Other 17 20%
Unknown 18 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 34 40%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 8%
Sports and Recreations 2 2%
Environmental Science 1 1%
Other 7 8%
Unknown 18 21%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 January 2017.
All research outputs
#8,420,801
of 25,305,422 outputs
Outputs from BMC Veterinary Research
#705
of 3,285 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#129,541
of 407,133 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Veterinary Research
#15
of 83 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,305,422 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 66th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,285 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 407,133 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 83 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.