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Selective constraints on protamine 2 in primates and rodents

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2016
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Title
Selective constraints on protamine 2 in primates and rodents
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12862-016-0588-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lena Lüke, Maximiliano Tourmente, Hernan Dopazo, François Serra, Eduardo R. S. Roldan

Abstract

Protamines are sperm nuclear proteins with a crucial role in chromatin condensation. Their function is strongly linked to sperm head morphology and male fertility. Protamines appear to be affected by a complex pattern of selective constraints. Previous studies showed that sexual selection affects protamine coding sequence and expression in rodents. Here we analyze selective constraints and post-copulatory sexual selection acting on protamine 2 (Prm2) gene sequences of 53 species of primates and rodents. We focused on possible differences in selective constraints between these two clades and on the two functional domains of PRM2 (cleaved- and mature-PRM2). We also assessed if and how changes in Prm2 coding sequence may affect sperm head dimensions. The domain of Prm2 that is cleaved off during binding to DNA (cleaved-Prm2) was found to be under purifying selection in both clades, whereas the domain that remains bound to DNA (mature-Prm2) was found to be positively selected in primates and under relaxed constraint in rodents. Changes in cleaved-Prm2 coding sequence are significantly correlated to sperm head width and elongation in rodents. Contrary to expectations, a significant effect of sexual selection was not found on either domain or clade. Mature-PRM2 may be free to evolve under less constraint due to the existence of PRM1 as a more conserved and functionally redundant copy. The cleaved-PRM2 domain seems to play an important role in sperm head shaping. However, sexual selection on its sequence may be difficult to detect until it is identified which sperm head phenotype (shape and size) confers advantages for sperm performance in different mammalian clades.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 2 8%
Switzerland 1 4%
Unknown 22 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 28%
Student > Master 4 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 8%
Lecturer 1 4%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 4 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 44%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 36%
Environmental Science 1 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 4%
Unknown 3 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 January 2016.
All research outputs
#7,457,984
of 8,599,230 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1,900
of 2,028 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#280,704
of 335,065 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#65
of 70 outputs
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