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Early nasogastric tube feeding in optimising treatment for hyperemesis gravidarum: the MOTHER randomised controlled trial (Maternal and Offspring outcomes after Treatment of HyperEmesis by Refeeding)

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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8 tweeters

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

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139 Mendeley
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Title
Early nasogastric tube feeding in optimising treatment for hyperemesis gravidarum: the MOTHER randomised controlled trial (Maternal and Offspring outcomes after Treatment of HyperEmesis by Refeeding)
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12884-016-0815-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Iris J. Grooten, Ben W. Mol, Joris A. M. van der Post, Carrie Ris-Stalpers, Marjolein Kok, Joke M. J. Bais, Caroline J. Bax, Johannes J. Duvekot, Henk A. Bremer, Martina M. Porath, Wieteke M. Heidema, Kitty W. M. Bloemenkamp, Hubertina C. J. Scheepers, Maureen T. M. Franssen, Martijn A. Oudijk, Tessa J. Roseboom, Rebecca C. Painter

Abstract

Hyperemesis gravidarum (HG), or intractable vomiting during pregnancy, is the single most frequent cause of hospital admission in early pregnancy. HG has a major impact on maternal quality of life and has repeatedly been associated with poor pregnancy outcome such as low birth weight. Currently, women with HG are admitted to hospital for intravenous fluid replacement, without receiving specific nutritional attention. Nasogastric tube feeding is sometimes used as last resort treatment. At present no randomised trials on dietary or rehydration interventions have been performed. Small observational studies indicate that enteral tube feeding may have the ability to effectively treat dehydration and malnutrition and alleviate nausea and vomiting symptoms. We aim to evaluate the effectiveness of early enteral tube feeding in addition to standard care on nausea and vomiting symptoms and pregnancy outcomes in HG patients. The MOTHER trial is a multicentre open label randomised controlled trial ( www.studies-obsgyn.nl/mother ). Women ≥ 18 years hospitalised for HG between 5 + 0 and 19 + 6 weeks gestation are eligible for participation. After informed consent participants are randomly allocated to standard care with intravenous rehydration or early enteral tube feeding in addition to standard care. All women keep a weekly diary to record symptoms and dietary intake until 20 weeks gestation. The primary outcome will be neonatal birth weight. Secondary outcomes will be the 24-h Pregnancy Unique Quantification of Emesis and nausea score (PUQE-24), maternal weight gain, dietary intake, duration of hospital stay, number of readmissions, quality of life and side-effects. Also gestational age at birth, placental weight, umbilical cord plasma lipid concentration and neonatal morbidity will be evaluated. Analysis will be according to the intention to treat principle. With this trial we aim to clarify whether early enteral tube feeding is more effective in treating HG than intravenous rehydration alone and improves pregnancy outcome. NTR4197 . Date of registration: October 2(nd) 2013.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 139 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Egypt 1 <1%
Unknown 138 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 22 16%
Student > Bachelor 17 12%
Researcher 11 8%
Unspecified 11 8%
Student > Postgraduate 9 6%
Other 31 22%
Unknown 38 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 41 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 26 19%
Unspecified 10 7%
Social Sciences 7 5%
Psychology 6 4%
Other 11 8%
Unknown 38 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 October 2016.
All research outputs
#5,479,638
of 22,842,950 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1,386
of 4,190 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#88,977
of 396,850 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#18
of 65 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,842,950 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,190 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 396,850 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 65 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.