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Inequity in waiting for cataract surgery - an analysis of data from the Swedish National Cataract Register

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal for Equity in Health, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
15 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
29 Mendeley
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Title
Inequity in waiting for cataract surgery - an analysis of data from the Swedish National Cataract Register
Published in
International Journal for Equity in Health, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12939-016-0302-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Goldina Smirthwaite, Mats Lundström, Barbro Wijma, Nina Lykke, Katarina Swahnberg

Abstract

Swedish Health and Medical Services act states that good care should be given to the entire population on equal terms. Still studies show that access to care in Sweden differ related to for example gender and socioeconomic variables. One of the areas in Swedish health care that has attracted attention for potential inequity in access is Cataract Extraction (CE). Previous studies of access to CE in Sweden show that female patients have in general poorer vision before they are operated and longer waiting times for CE than male patients. The aim of the study was to describe the waiting times in different patient groups with regards to visual acuity, gender, age, native country, educational level, annual income and whether the patient was retired or still working. The study was designed as a register study of 102 532 patients who have had CE performed in Sweden 2010-2011. Linear regression was used to analyse the association between patient characteristics and waiting times. Mean waiting times for women and men were calculated for all groups. At significance level p < 0.05 longer waiting times corresponded to patients having good visual acuity, being of female gender, high age, retired, born outside the Nordic countries and having low income and education. Calculations of mean waiting times for all groups showed that women had longer waiting times than men. The differences between groups defined, for example, by gender, age, native country, income, education and retirement are statistically significant. We do not consider them as clinically significant, but we consider the consistent pattern that we have found noteworthy in relation to the principle of equity in health care.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 21%
Student > Bachelor 4 14%
Researcher 4 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 10%
Student > Postgraduate 2 7%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 7 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 34%
Social Sciences 4 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 9 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 47. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 April 2020.
All research outputs
#760,737
of 22,842,950 outputs
Outputs from International Journal for Equity in Health
#84
of 1,907 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,143
of 394,468 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal for Equity in Health
#2
of 46 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,842,950 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,907 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 394,468 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 46 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.