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Prevalence of antibodies against Ehrlichia spp. and Orientia tsutsugamushi in small mammals around harbors in Taiwan

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, January 2016
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Title
Prevalence of antibodies against Ehrlichia spp. and Orientia tsutsugamushi in small mammals around harbors in Taiwan
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13071-016-1318-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kun-Hsien Tsai, Shu-Feng Chang, Tsai-Ying Yen, Wei-Liang Shih, Wan-Jen Chen, Hsi-Chieh Wang, Xue-Jie Yu, Tzai-Hung Wen, Wen-Jer Wu, Pei-Yun Shu

Abstract

Tick-borne ehrlichiosis and mite-borne scrub typhus represent important emerging zoonotic rickettsial diseases. Although scrub typhus has been recognized by the Taiwanese public health system, information on ehrlichial infections is scarce in Taiwan. In this study, the risk of spread of ectoparasites on rodents through aerial and marine transportation was assessed in international and domestic harbors. Here, we report the first systematic surveillance of seroprevalence against Ehrlichia spp. in small mammals on the main island of Taiwan. In total, 1648 small mammals were trapped from 8 international ports, 18 domestic fishing harbors, and 7 local public health centers around Taiwan from November 2004 to December 2008. Sera were analyzed using indirect immunofluorescence assays to detect IgG antibodies against Ehrlichia chaffeensis and Orientia tsutsugamushi. A serum titer of ≧1:80 was considered positive. Antibodies against Ehrlichia spp. and O. tsutsugamushi were detected in 3.28 % and 4.92 % of small mammals active around harbors, respectively. The seropositive rate against Ehrlichia was higher in northern Taiwan from 2005 to 2008. However, O. tsutsugamushi infections increased in southern Taiwan during this period. The serological evidence of ehrlichial and O. tsutsugamushi infections in all international ports were included in the study. No significant differences were found among the seropositive rates of Ehrlichia spp. and O. tsutsugamushi in small mammals trapped between international and local harbors. The overall prevalence of Ehrlichia spp. and O. tsutsugamushi infections in small mammals active around harbors was 3.28 % and 4.92 %, respectively. The results provided serological evidence supporting the potential risks of transporting pathogens through air and maritime traffic. This study highlights serious issues of the emergence and spread of rickettsial diseases in Taiwan. The incidence of human ehrlichiosis requires further investigation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 18%
Professor 3 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 11%
Researcher 3 11%
Student > Master 3 11%
Other 4 14%
Unknown 7 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 5 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 14%
Environmental Science 3 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Other 5 18%
Unknown 7 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 January 2016.
All research outputs
#5,287,924
of 7,059,888 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#1,385
of 1,904 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#219,739
of 319,092 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#125
of 158 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,059,888 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,904 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 158 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 4th percentile – i.e., 4% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.