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Post-prandial glucose and insulin responses of hummus alone or combined with a carbohydrate food: a dose–response study

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition Journal, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
twitter
7 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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20 Dimensions

Readers on

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72 Mendeley
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Title
Post-prandial glucose and insulin responses of hummus alone or combined with a carbohydrate food: a dose–response study
Published in
Nutrition Journal, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12937-016-0129-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Livia S. A. Augustin, Laura Chiavaroli, Janice Campbell, Adish Ezatagha, Alexandra L. Jenkins, Amin Esfahani, Cyril W. C. Kendall

Abstract

Pulses are low glycemic index (GI) foods and have been associated with reduced risk of heart disease, diabetes and some cancers. However the blood glucose and insulin responses of hummus, a food containing chickpea, have not been thoroughly tested. Ten healthy subjects each consumed 11 breakfast study meals in randomized order over a period of 15 weeks. Hummus was consumed alone at three doses (2.7 g, 10.8 g and 25 g available carbohydrate [avCHO] portions) and with 50 g avCHO from white bread at three doses (2.7 g, 5.4 g and 10.8 g avCHO portions). The responses elicited by hummus alone were compared with 25 g avCHO portions of white bread, while those after hummus plus white bread were compared with 50 g avCHO from white bread. Plasma glucose and serum insulin responses were monitored over two hours and the GI and insulin index (II) calculated using standard methodology. The GI and II of hummus were 15 ± 3 and 52 ± 13, respectively, and were significantly lower than white bread (P < 0.05). The glucose and insulin incremental area under the curve (IAUC) for hummus alone were significantly lower than white bread except for insulin IAUC of hummus 25 g avCHO. The peak rise of blood glucose and insulin after hummus were significantly lower than after white bread. Glucose and insulin IAUC after adding hummus to bread did not differ significantly from white bread alone. However the blood glucose 45 min after adding 25 g avCHO from hummus to white bread was significantly lower while at 120 min it was significantly higher than after white bread alone. This study demonstrated that, similar to chickpeas, hummus has a very low GI and II. Postprandial glucose responses were 4 times less than that of white bread and did not compromise insulin levels.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 72 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 13 18%
Student > Master 11 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 14%
Student > Postgraduate 5 7%
Professor 4 6%
Other 12 17%
Unknown 17 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 6%
Chemical Engineering 2 3%
Other 7 10%
Unknown 18 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 26. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 August 2021.
All research outputs
#1,132,091
of 21,175,128 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition Journal
#320
of 1,379 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#23,018
of 373,390 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,175,128 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,379 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 33.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 373,390 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them