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Prevalence and risk factors for viral exposure in rural dogs around protected areas of the Atlantic forest

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Veterinary Research, January 2016
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2 tweeters

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137 Mendeley
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Title
Prevalence and risk factors for viral exposure in rural dogs around protected areas of the Atlantic forest
Published in
BMC Veterinary Research, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12917-016-0646-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nelson Henrique de Almeida Curi, Nelson Henrique de Almeida Curi, Rodrigo Lima Massara, Ana Maria de Oliveira Paschoal, Amanda Soriano-Araújo, Zélia Inês Portela Lobato, Guilherme Ramos Demétrio, Adriano Garcia Chiarello, Marcelo Passamani

Abstract

Despite the crucial role of domestic dogs as reservoirs for zoonosis and some of the most threatening diseases for wild carnivores such as distemper and parvovirosis, little is known about the epidemiological features and the risk factors involved in pathogen exposure of dogs that live in human/wildlife interfaces and actually contacts wildlife. Through a cross-sectional serological approach and questionnaire survey, we assessed the prevalence along with individual and environment-associated risk factors for four important viral diseases of rural dogs living in households around six Atlantic Forest fragments in southeast Brazil. Widespread exposure to canine parvovirus (97 %), canine distemper virus (15 %) and canine adenovirus (27 %) was detected, but none for canine coronavirus. Dogs from small private reserves were more exposed to parvovirus and canine distemper virus than those from larger state parks. Exposure was associated with dog sex and age, lack of health care and the number of people in the households. Remarkably, factors linked to free-ranging behaviour of dogs were associated with the exposure for all pathogens detected. According to identified associations, reducing viral pathogen exposure in dogs will require inhibiting dog's movements and access to nearby forests and villages and improving veterinary assistance. Promoting dog vaccination and population control through sterilization around protected areas is also necessary. The study provides support for preventive management actions aimed to protect the health of rural dogs, and consequently of Atlantic Forest's wild carnivores.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 137 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 1%
Unknown 135 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 20 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 17 12%
Student > Bachelor 17 12%
Researcher 14 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 9%
Other 25 18%
Unknown 31 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 27 20%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 26 19%
Environmental Science 13 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 5%
Social Sciences 4 3%
Other 19 14%
Unknown 41 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 January 2016.
All research outputs
#18,437,241
of 22,842,950 outputs
Outputs from BMC Veterinary Research
#1,921
of 3,050 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#284,431
of 393,571 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Veterinary Research
#50
of 84 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,842,950 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,050 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 84 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.