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Perception and attitudes towards preventives of malaria infection during pregnancy in Enugu State, Nigeria

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Health, Population, & Nutrition, November 2015
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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128 Mendeley
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Title
Perception and attitudes towards preventives of malaria infection during pregnancy in Enugu State, Nigeria
Published in
Journal of Health, Population, & Nutrition, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s41043-015-0033-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nkechi G. Onyeneho, Ngozi Idemili-Aronu, Ijeoma Igwe, Felicia U. Iremeka

Abstract

The objective of this study is to explore and document perceptions and attitude associated with uptake of interventions to prevent malaria in pregnancy infection during pregnancy in Enugu State, Nigeria. This is a cross-sectional study in three local government areas in Enugu State to identify the people's perceptions and attitudes towards sleeping under insecticide-treated bednets and uptake of recommended doses of intermittent presumptive treatment during pregnancy. In-depth interview guides were employed to collect data from health workers and mothers who delivered within 6 months preceding the study, while focus group discussion guides were employed in collecting data from grandmothers and fathers of children born within 6 months preceding the study. The people expressed fairly good knowledge of malaria, having lived in the malaria-endemic communities. However, some were ignorant on what should be done to prevent malaria in pregnancy. Those who were aware of the use of insecticide-treated bednets and intermittent presumptive treatment during pregnancy however lamented the attitude of the health workers, who make access to these interventions difficult. Efforts to prevent malaria in pregnancy should focus on providing health education to pregnant women and their partners, who reinforce what the women are told during antenatal care. The attitude of health workers towards patients, who need these interventions, should be targeted for change.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 128 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Nigeria 1 <1%
Unknown 127 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 44 34%
Researcher 17 13%
Student > Bachelor 11 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 8%
Student > Postgraduate 8 6%
Other 20 16%
Unknown 18 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 47 37%
Social Sciences 18 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 16 13%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 2%
Other 15 12%
Unknown 25 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 January 2021.
All research outputs
#14,002,637
of 18,234,522 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Health, Population, & Nutrition
#296
of 393 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#227,934
of 352,995 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Health, Population, & Nutrition
#4
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,234,522 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 393 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 352,995 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.