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The bending of cell sheets - from folding to rolling

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biology, December 2011
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Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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24 Dimensions

Readers on

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64 Mendeley
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Title
The bending of cell sheets - from folding to rolling
Published in
BMC Biology, December 2011
DOI 10.1186/1741-7007-9-90
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ray Keller, David Shook

Abstract

The bending of cell sheets plays a major role in multicellular embryonic morphogenesis. Recent advances are leading to a deeper understanding of how the biophysical properties and the force-producing behaviors of cells are regulated, and how these forces are integrated across cell sheets during bending. We review work that shows that the dynamic balance of apical versus basolateral cortical tension controls specific aspects of invagination of epithelial sheets, and recent evidence that tissue expansion by growth contributes to neural retinal invagination in a stem cell-derived, self-organizing system. Of special interest is the detailed analysis of the type B inversion in Volvox reported in BMC Biology by Höhn and Hallmann, as this is a system that promises to be particularly instructive in understanding morphogenesis of any monolayered spheroid system.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 64 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 2%
Australia 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Iran, Islamic Republic of 1 2%
Spain 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 58 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 34%
Researcher 18 28%
Professor 4 6%
Student > Bachelor 4 6%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 5%
Other 8 13%
Unknown 5 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 36 56%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 22%
Physics and Astronomy 4 6%
Chemistry 2 3%
Computer Science 1 2%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 5 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 January 2012.
All research outputs
#12,113,143
of 21,542,809 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biology
#1,389
of 1,861 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#140,373
of 251,871 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biology
#55
of 70 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,542,809 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,861 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.3. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 251,871 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 70 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.