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Convergent evolution of hemoglobin switching in jawed and jawless vertebrates

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, February 2016
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Title
Convergent evolution of hemoglobin switching in jawed and jawless vertebrates
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12862-016-0597-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kim Rohlfing, Friederike Stuhlmann, Margaret F. Docker, Thorsten Burmester

Abstract

During development, humans and other jawed vertebrates (Gnathostomata) express distinct hemoglobin genes, resulting in different hemoglobin tetramers. Embryonic and fetal hemoglobin have higher oxygen affinities than the adult hemoglobin, sustaining the oxygen demand of the developing organism. Little is known about the expression of hemoglobins during development of jawless vertebrates (Agnatha). We identified three hemoglobin switches in the life cycle of the sea lamprey. Three hemoglobin genes are specifically expressed in the embryo, four genes in the filter feeding larva (ammocoete), and nine genes correspond to the adult hemoglobin chains. During the development from the parasitic to the reproductive adult, the composition of hemoglobin changes again, with a massive increase of chain aHb1. A single hemoglobin chain is expressed constitutively in all stages. We further showed the differential expression of other globin genes: Myoglobin 1 is most highly expressed in the reproductive adult, myoglobin 2 expression peaks in the larva. Globin X1 is restricted to the embryo; globin X2 was only found in the reproductive adult. Cytoglobin is expressed at low levels throughout the life cycle. Because the hemoglobins of jawed and jawless vertebrates evolved independently from a common globin ancestor, hemoglobin switching must also have evolved convergently in these taxa. Notably, the ontogeny of sea lamprey hemoglobins essentially recapitulates their phylogeny, with the embryonic hemoglobins emerging first, followed by the evolution of larval and adult hemoglobins.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 7 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 1 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 14%
Researcher 1 14%
Student > Master 1 14%
Unknown 3 43%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 29%
Unspecified 1 14%
Environmental Science 1 14%
Chemistry 1 14%
Unknown 2 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 February 2016.
All research outputs
#6,136,405
of 7,128,274 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1,685
of 1,802 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#265,563
of 320,504 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#54
of 59 outputs
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