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Hyperprolactinemia with Antipsychotic Drugs in Children and Adolescents

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology, January 2010
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Title
Hyperprolactinemia with Antipsychotic Drugs in Children and Adolescents
Published in
International Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology, January 2010
DOI 10.1155/2010/159402
Pubmed ID
Authors

Arlan L. Rosenbloom

Abstract

There is increasing use of antipsychotic drugs in pediatric and psychiatry practice for a wide range of behavioral and affective disorders. These drugs have prominent side effects of interest to pediatric endocrinologists, including weight gain and associated metabolic risk factors and hyperprolactinemia. The drugs block dopamine action, thus disinhibiting prolactin secretion. Hyperprolactinemia is especially prominent with first-generation antipsychotics such as haloperidol and the second-generation drugs, most commonly risperidone, with some patients developing gynecomastia or galactorrhea or, as a result of prolactin inhibition of gonadotropin releasing hormone from the hypothalamus, amenorrhea. With concern about the long-term effects of antipsychotics on bone mass and pituitary tumor formation, it is prudent to monitor serum prolactin levels in antipsychotic drug-treated pediatric patients and consider treatment with an agent less likely to induce hyperprolactinemia.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 6%
Unknown 34 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 19%
Researcher 5 14%
Lecturer 4 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Other 7 19%
Unknown 7 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 44%
Psychology 5 14%
Neuroscience 4 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 8 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 February 2011.
All research outputs
#15,240,835
of 22,660,862 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology
#87
of 129 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#133,996
of 163,484 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology
#16
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,660,862 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 129 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.8. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 163,484 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.