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Evolution of the levels of human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G) in Beninese infant during the first year of life in a malaria endemic area: using latent class analysis

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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39 Mendeley
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Title
Evolution of the levels of human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G) in Beninese infant during the first year of life in a malaria endemic area: using latent class analysis
Published in
Malaria Journal, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12936-016-1131-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tania C. d’Almeida, Ibrahim Sadissou, Gilles Cottrell, Rachida Tahar, Philippe Moreau, Benoit Favier, Kabirou Moutairou, Eduardo A. Donadi, Achille Massougbodji, Nathalie Rouass-Freiss, David Courtin, André Garcia

Abstract

HLA-G, a non-classical HLA class I antigen, is of crucial interest during pregnancy by inhibiting maternal immune response. Its role during infections is discussed, and it has been described that high levels of soluble HLA-G during childhood increase the risk of malaria. To explore more precisely interactions between soluble HLA-G and malaria, latent class analysis was used to test whether distinct sub-populations of children, each with distinctive soluble HLA-G evolutions may suggest the existence of groups presenting variable malaria susceptibility. A study was conducted in Benin from 2010 to 2013 and 165 children were followed from birth to 12 months. Evolution of soluble HLA-G was studied by the latent class method. Three groups of children were identified: one with consistently low levels of soluble HLA-G during follow-up, a second with very high levels and a last intermediate group. In all groups, low birth weight, high number of malaria infections and high exposure to malaria transmission were associated with high level of soluble HLA-G. Placental malaria was not. Presence of soluble HLA-G in cord blood increased the probability of belonging to the highest trajectory. These results, together with previous ones, confirm the important role of HLA-G in the individual susceptibility to malaria. Assaying soluble HLA-G at birth could be a good indicator of newborns more fragile and at risk of infections during childhood.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 21%
Researcher 6 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Student > Bachelor 2 5%
Other 6 15%
Unknown 8 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 10%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 5%
Other 8 21%
Unknown 11 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 March 2016.
All research outputs
#692,675
of 7,367,723 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#219
of 2,451 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#42,410
of 322,597 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#13
of 183 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,367,723 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,451 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 322,597 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 183 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.