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Drivers of hibernation in the brown bear

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Zoology, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#18 of 635)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
11 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
6 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
82 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
170 Mendeley
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Title
Drivers of hibernation in the brown bear
Published in
Frontiers in Zoology, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12983-016-0140-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. L. Evans, N. J. Singh, A. Friebe, J. M. Arnemo, T. G. Laske, O. Fröbert, J. E. Swenson, S. Blanc

Abstract

Hibernation has been a key area of research for several decades, essentially in small mammals in the laboratory, yet we know very little about what triggers or ends it in the wild. Do climatic factors, an internal biological clock, or physiological processes dominate? Using state-of-the-art tracking and monitoring technology on fourteen free-ranging brown bears over three winters, we recorded movement, heart rate (HR), heart rate variability (HRV), body temperature (Tb), physical activity, ambient temperature (TA), and snow depth to identify the drivers of the start and end of hibernation. We used behavioral change point analyses to estimate the start and end of hibernation and convergent cross mapping to identify the causal interactions between the ecological and physiological variables over time. To our knowledge, we have built the first chronology of both ecological and physiological events from before the start to the end of hibernation in the field. Activity, HR, and Tb started to drop slowly several weeks before den entry. Bears entered the den when snow arrived and when ambient temperature reached 0 °C. HRV, taken as a proxy of sympathetic nervous system activity, dropped dramatically once the bear entered the den. This indirectly suggests that denning is tightly coupled to metabolic suppression. During arousal, the unexpected early rise in Tb (two months before den exit) was driven by TA, but was independent of HRV. The difference between Tb and TA decreased gradually suggesting that bears were not thermoconforming. HRV increased only three weeks before exit, indicating that late activation of the sympathetic nervous system likely finalized restoration of euthermic metabolism. Interestingly, it was not until TA reached the presumed lower critical temperature, likely indicating that the bears were seeking thermoneutrality, that they exited the den. We conclude that brown bear hibernation was initiated primarily by environmental cues, but terminated by physiological cues.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 170 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Hungary 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Unknown 168 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 28 16%
Student > Master 27 16%
Researcher 25 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 14%
Other 10 6%
Other 19 11%
Unknown 37 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 60 35%
Environmental Science 27 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 6%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 8 5%
Neuroscience 5 3%
Other 16 9%
Unknown 44 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 102. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 April 2022.
All research outputs
#314,666
of 21,576,978 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Zoology
#18
of 635 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,697
of 377,357 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Zoology
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,576,978 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 635 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 377,357 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them