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α-Synuclein and neuronal cell death

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Neurodegeneration, January 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
patent
1 patent
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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251 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
389 Mendeley
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Title
α-Synuclein and neuronal cell death
Published in
Molecular Neurodegeneration, January 2009
DOI 10.1186/1750-1326-4-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mark R Cookson

Abstract

alpha-Synuclein is a small protein that has special relevance for understanding Parkinson disease and related disorders. Not only is alpha-synuclein found in Lewy bodies characteristic of Parkinson disease, but also mutations in the gene for alpha-synuclein can cause an inherited form of Parkinson disease and expression of normal alpha-synuclein can increase the risk of developing Parkinson disease in sporadic, or non-familial, cases. Both sporadic and familial Parkinson disease are characterized by substantial loss of several groups of neurons, including the dopaminergic cells of the substantia nigra that are the target of most current symptomatic therapies. Therefore, it is predicted that alpha-synuclein, especially in its mutant forms or under conditions where its expression levels are increased, is a toxic protein in the sense that it is associated with an increased rate of neuronal cell death. This review will discuss the experimental contexts in which alpha-synuclein has been demonstrated to be toxic. I will also outline what is known about the mechanisms by which alpha-synuclein triggers neuronal damage, and identify some of the current gaps in our knowledge about this subject. Finally, the therapeutic implications of toxicity of alpha-synuclein will be discussed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 389 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 2%
India 5 1%
Germany 3 <1%
Luxembourg 2 <1%
Belgium 2 <1%
Australia 2 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Other 4 1%
Unknown 362 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 94 24%
Researcher 76 20%
Student > Master 70 18%
Student > Bachelor 56 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 19 5%
Other 49 13%
Unknown 25 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 160 41%
Medicine and Dentistry 51 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 47 12%
Neuroscience 39 10%
Chemistry 26 7%
Other 36 9%
Unknown 30 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 January 2019.
All research outputs
#3,260,246
of 14,083,757 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Neurodegeneration
#296
of 591 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#41,831
of 213,411 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Neurodegeneration
#6
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,083,757 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 591 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.9. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 213,411 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.