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A cross sectional study of anemia and iron deficiency as risk factors for arsenic-induced skin lesions in Bangladeshi women

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, February 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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50 Mendeley
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Title
A cross sectional study of anemia and iron deficiency as risk factors for arsenic-induced skin lesions in Bangladeshi women
Published in
BMC Public Health, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-2824-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Molly L. Kile, Joycelyn M. Faraj, Alayne G. Ronnenberg, Quazi Quamruzzaman, Mahmudar Rahman, Golam Mostofa, Sakila Afroz, David C. Christiani

Abstract

In the Ganges Delta, chronic arsenic poisoning is a health concern affecting millions of people who rely on groundwater as their potable water source. The prevalence of anemia is also high in this region, particularly among women. Moreover, arsenic is known to affect heme synthesis and erythrocytes and the risk of arsenic-induced skin lesions appears to differ by sex. We conducted a case-control study in 147 arsenic-exposed Bangladeshi women to assess the association between anemia and arsenic-induced skin lesions. We observed that the odds of arsenic-related skin lesions were approximately three times higher among women who were anemic (hemoglobin < 120 g/L) compared to women with normal hemoglobin levels [Odds Ratio (OR) = 3.32, 95 % Confidence Intervals (CI): 1.29, 8.52] after adjusting for arsenic levels in drinking water and other covariates. Furthermore, 75 % of the women with anemia had adequate iron stores (serum ferritin ≥12 μg/L), suggesting that the majority of anemia detected in this population was unrelated to iron depletion. Considering the magnitude of arsenic exposure and prevalence of anemia in Bangladeshi women, additional research is warranted that identifies the causes of anemia so that effective interventions can be implemented while arsenic remediation efforts continue.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 50 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 16%
Researcher 7 14%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Other 4 8%
Other 7 14%
Unknown 9 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 22%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 5 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 8%
Social Sciences 3 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Other 9 18%
Unknown 16 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 February 2016.
All research outputs
#2,816,473
of 7,313,486 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#3,241
of 6,496 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#100,117
of 284,086 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#109
of 226 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,313,486 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 60th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,496 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.2. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,086 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 226 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.