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Physical activity and non-movement behaviours: their independent and combined associations with metabolic syndrome

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
31 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
155 Mendeley
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Title
Physical activity and non-movement behaviours: their independent and combined associations with metabolic syndrome
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0350-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Deepa P Rao, Heather Orpana, Daniel Krewski, Deepa P. Rao, Rao, Deepa P, Orpana, Heather, Krewski, Daniel

Abstract

Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a prevalent risk condition associated with a higher risk of chronic conditions, including diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Physical activity and non-movement behaviours (NMB), including sleep, screen time and sedentary activity, have been associated with MetS. In light of the increasing prevalence of NMBs, and the moderate rates of physical activity guideline adherence in Canada, this analysis examines the independent and combined associations of NMB and physical activity with MetS. Data on Canadians 18 years and older from the Canadian Health Measures Survey (n = 2901) were used to examine the moderating effect of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) guideline adherence (150 minutes or more of MVPA/week, based on accelerometer) on the association of NMBs (sleep based on self-report, screen time based on self-report, and sedentary time based on accelerometer) with MetS. Logistic regression analyses were conducted and sampling weights were applied to represent the Canadian adult population. A graded association between PA and MetS was observed, with those achieving less MVPA than guidelines having a higher odds of MetS (OR 2.9, 95 % CI: 1.9-4.5 for < 75 mins/week of MVPA, and OR 1.8, 95 % CI: 1.2-2.8 for 75-150 mins/week, as compared to those accumulating 150 mins/week or more). When examining the moderating effect of PA on the association between NMBs and MetS, we found that (1) for participants who met guidelines, no level of any NMB was significantly associated with MetS and (2) for those who did not achieve guidelines, there was an increased odds of MetS based on excess NMB time(OR 3.2, 95 % CI: 1.5-6.8 for 1.4-2.1 h/day and OR 4.4, 95 % CI: 2.5-7.9 for ≥2.1 h/day of screen time and 75-150 mins/week of MVPA, OR 1.7, 95 % CI: 1.1-2.5 for ≥8 h/day of sleep time and <75 mins/week of MVPA, and OR 2.2, 95 % CI: 1.3-3.8 for 9.2-10.3 h/day of sedentary time and <75 mins/week of MVPA). Adhering to physical activity guidelines may mitigate the associations of NMBs with MetS. Given the novel findings that associations between NMBs and MetS were not significant among Canadians meeting PA guidelines, these results suggest the beneficial role of physical activity to prevent chronic disease risk.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 31 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 155 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 152 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 28 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 13%
Researcher 17 11%
Student > Bachelor 15 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 6%
Other 33 21%
Unknown 33 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 35 23%
Sports and Recreations 21 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 19 12%
Psychology 10 6%
Social Sciences 8 5%
Other 17 11%
Unknown 45 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 October 2017.
All research outputs
#1,379,794
of 19,527,185 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#581
of 1,767 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,906
of 274,529 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#4
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,527,185 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,767 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,529 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.