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Transmission-blocking strategies: the roadmap from laboratory bench to the community

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, February 2016
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (61st percentile)

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3 Facebook pages

Citations

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37 Dimensions

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165 Mendeley
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Title
Transmission-blocking strategies: the roadmap from laboratory bench to the community
Published in
Malaria Journal, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12936-016-1163-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniel Gonçalves, Patrick Hunziker

Abstract

Malaria remains one of the most prevalent tropical and infectious diseases in the world, with an estimated more than 200 million clinical cases every year. In recent years, the mosquito stages of the parasite life cycle have received renewed attention with some progress being made in the development of transmission-blocking strategies. From gametocytes to late ookinetes, some attractive antigenic targets have been found and tested in order to develop a transmission blocking vaccine, and drugs are being currently screened for gametocytocidal activity, and also some new and less conventional approaches are drawing increased attention, such as genetically modified and fungus-infected mosquitoes that become refractory to Plasmodium infection. In this review some of those strategies focusing on the progress made so far will be summarized, but also, the challenges that come from the translation of early promising benchwork resulting in successful applications in the field. To do this, the available literature will be screened and all the pieces of the puzzle must be combined: from molecular biology to epidemiologic and clinical data.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 165 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Ghana 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Unknown 158 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 32 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 14%
Researcher 22 13%
Student > Bachelor 18 11%
Student > Postgraduate 7 4%
Other 28 17%
Unknown 35 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 37 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 31 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 8 5%
Chemistry 7 4%
Other 24 15%
Unknown 37 22%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 July 2016.
All research outputs
#7,162,353
of 22,849,304 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#2,252
of 5,573 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#99,623
of 298,010 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#70
of 185 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,849,304 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 68th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,573 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,010 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 185 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.