↓ Skip to main content

Health implications of fructose consumption: A review of recent data

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition & Metabolism, January 2010
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
34 tweeters
facebook
9 Facebook pages
wikipedia
4 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
q&a
2 Q&A threads
video
5 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
123 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
387 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Health implications of fructose consumption: A review of recent data
Published in
Nutrition & Metabolism, January 2010
DOI 10.1186/1743-7075-7-82
Pubmed ID
Authors

Salwa W Rizkalla

Abstract

This paper reviews evidence in the context of current research linking dietary fructose to health risk markers.Fructose intake has recently received considerable media attention, most of which has been negative. The assertion has been that dietary fructose is less satiating and more lipogenic than other sugars. However, no fully relevant data have been presented to account for a direct link between dietary fructose intake and health risk markers such as obesity, triglyceride accumulation and insulin resistance in humans. First: a re-evaluation of published epidemiological studies concerning the consumption of dietary fructose or mainly high fructose corn syrup shows that most of such studies have been cross-sectional or based on passive inaccurate surveillance, especially in children and adolescents, and thus have not established direct causal links. Second: research evidence of the short or acute term satiating power or increasing food intake after fructose consumption as compared to that resulting from normal patterns of sugar consumption, such as sucrose, remains inconclusive. Third: the results of longer-term intervention studies depend mainly on the type of sugar used for comparison. Typically aspartame, glucose, or sucrose is used and no negative effects are found when sucrose is used as a control group.Negative conclusions have been drawn from studies in rodents or in humans attempting to elucidate the mechanisms and biological pathways underlying fructose consumption by using unrealistically high fructose amounts.The issue of dietary fructose and health is linked to the quantity consumed, which is the same issue for any macro- or micro nutrients. It has been considered that moderate fructose consumption of ≤50g/day or ~10% of energy has no deleterious effect on lipid and glucose control and of ≤100g/day does not influence body weight. No fully relevant data account for a direct link between moderate dietary fructose intake and health risk markers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 34 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 387 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 <1%
Australia 2 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Greece 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 375 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 72 19%
Student > Bachelor 68 18%
Researcher 46 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 41 11%
Other 26 7%
Other 74 19%
Unknown 60 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 86 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 74 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 37 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 29 7%
Sports and Recreations 14 4%
Other 71 18%
Unknown 76 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 67. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 July 2022.
All research outputs
#504,048
of 21,775,893 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition & Metabolism
#90
of 922 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,394
of 249,193 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition & Metabolism
#11
of 39 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,775,893 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 922 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 249,193 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 39 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.