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Larvae of Ixodes ricinus transmit Borrelia afzelii and B. miyamotoi to vertebrate hosts

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, February 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

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36 X users
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15 Facebook pages

Citations

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104 Dimensions

Readers on

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135 Mendeley
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Title
Larvae of Ixodes ricinus transmit Borrelia afzelii and B. miyamotoi to vertebrate hosts
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13071-016-1389-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gilian van Duijvendijk, Claudia Coipan, Alex Wagemakers, Manoj Fonville, Jasmin Ersöz, Anneke Oei, Gábor Földvári, Joppe Hovius, Willem Takken, Hein Sprong

Abstract

Lyme borreliosis is the most common tick-borne human disease and is caused by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.). Borrelia miyamotoi, a relapsing fever spirochaete, is transmitted transovarially, whereas this has not been shown for B. burgdorferi (s.l). Therefore, B. burgdorferi (s.l) is considered to cycle from nymphs to larvae through vertebrates. Larvae of Ixodes ricinus are occasionally B. burgdorferi (s.l) infected, but their vector competence has never been studied. We challenged 20 laboratory mice with field-collected larvae of I. ricinus. A subset of these larvae was analysed for infections with B. burgdorferi (s.l) and B. miyamotoi. After three to four challenges, mice were sacrificed and skin and spleen samples were analysed for infection by PCR and culture. Field-collected larvae were naturally infected with B. burgdorferi (s.l) (0.62 %) and B. miyamotoi (2.0 %). Two mice acquired a B. afzelii infection and four mice acquired a B. miyamotoi infection during the larval challenges. We showed that larvae of I. ricinus transmit B. afzelii and B. miyamotoi to rodents and calculated that rodents have a considerable chance of acquiring infections from larvae compared to nymphs. As a result, B. afzelii can cycle between larvae through rodents. Our findings further imply that larval bites on humans, which easily go unnoticed, can cause Lyme borreliosis and Borrelia miyamotoi disease.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 36 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 135 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Hungary 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Unknown 132 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 16%
Researcher 21 16%
Student > Master 13 10%
Student > Bachelor 11 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 7%
Other 25 19%
Unknown 34 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 34 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 10 7%
Environmental Science 7 5%
Other 15 11%
Unknown 44 33%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 27. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 April 2019.
All research outputs
#1,384,991
of 24,931,592 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#191
of 5,867 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,655
of 303,831 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#8
of 166 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 24,931,592 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,867 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 303,831 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 166 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.