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Harvesting of freshwater microalgae with microbial bioflocculant: a pilot-scale study

Overview of attention for article published in Biotechnology for Biofuels, January 2016
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Title
Harvesting of freshwater microalgae with microbial bioflocculant: a pilot-scale study
Published in
Biotechnology for Biofuels, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13068-016-0458-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ndikubwimana, Theoneste, Zeng, Xianhai, Murwanashyaka, Theophile, Manirafasha, Emmanuel, He, Ning, Shao, Wenyao, Lu, Yinghua

Abstract

Nowadays, bioflocculation is considered as a potential technology that could be able to alleviate microalgae dewatering cost regarded as the cornerstone hindrance of their full-scale application. However, most bioflocculation studies reported are laboratory scales. This study examined a pilot-scale and in situ flocculation of freshwater microalgae Desmodesmus brasiliensis by microbial bioflocculant. Biochemical composition of microalgal biomass was analyzed to evaluate the applicability of bioflocculation for microalgae-based biofuel production. The flocculation efficiency >98 % was achieved at both pilot-scale and in situ treatment. Bioflocculation is simple, effective, economic, and environmentally friendly. Even though total proteins recovered from biomass harvested by centrifugation and that harvested by bioflocculation were significantly different, there was no significant difference in total carbohydrates and total lipids recovered from either biomass harvested by centrifugation or biomass harvested by bioflocculation. The results herein presented, doubtlessly demonstrated that the γ-PGA bioflocculant produced by Bacillus licheniformis CGMCC 2876 is applicable for commercial-scale microalgae harvesting. In addition, bioflocculation process cost could greatly be reduced by in situ operation as no investment cost is needed for a separate flocculation tank and mixing device. Furthermore, bioflocculation method developed is a worthy microalgae harvesting method for algal-based biofuel production.Graphical abstractThe addition of bioflocculant to microalgae cultures followed by mixing elicits, the formation of heavy flocs which settle out by gravity sedimentation in a relatively short settling time.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 156 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Nepal 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Unknown 152 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 28 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 15%
Student > Master 23 15%
Researcher 19 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 6%
Other 23 15%
Unknown 30 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 26 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 15%
Environmental Science 15 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 15 10%
Chemical Engineering 13 8%
Other 15 10%
Unknown 48 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 March 2016.
All research outputs
#18,444,553
of 22,852,911 outputs
Outputs from Biotechnology for Biofuels
#1,048
of 1,395 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#284,450
of 393,602 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biotechnology for Biofuels
#40
of 71 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,852,911 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,395 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 393,602 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 71 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.