↓ Skip to main content

Japanese encephalitis virus tropism in experimentally infected pigs

Overview of attention for article published in Veterinary Research, January 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
51 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
77 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Japanese encephalitis virus tropism in experimentally infected pigs
Published in
Veterinary Research, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13567-016-0319-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Meret E. Ricklin, Obdulio Garcìa-Nicolàs, Daniel Brechbühl, Sylvie Python, Beatrice Zumkehr, Horst Posthaus, Anna Oevermann, Artur Summerfield

Abstract

Pigs are considered to be the main amplifying host for Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), and their infection can correlate with human cases of disease. Despite their importance in the ecology of the virus as it relates to human cases of encephalitis, the pathogenesis of JEV in pigs remains obscure. In the present study, the localization and kinetics of virus replication were investigated in various tissues after experimental intravenous infection of pigs. The data demonstrate a rapid and broad spreading of the virus to the central nervous system (CNS) and various other organs. A particular tropism of JEV in pigs not only to the CNS but also for secondary lymphoid tissue, in particular the tonsils with the overall highest viral loads, was observed. In this organ, even 11 days post infection, the latest time point of the experiment, no apparent decrease in viral RNA loads and live virus was found despite the presence of a neutralizing antibody response. This was also well beyond the clinical and viremic phase. These results are of significance for the pathogenesis of JEV, and call for further experimental studies focusing on the cellular source and duration of virus replication in pigs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 77 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 77 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 14%
Student > Master 11 14%
Other 8 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 8%
Student > Bachelor 6 8%
Other 15 19%
Unknown 20 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 12 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 3%
Other 14 18%
Unknown 21 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 September 2016.
All research outputs
#13,109,801
of 22,852,911 outputs
Outputs from Veterinary Research
#567
of 1,205 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#182,509
of 393,602 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Veterinary Research
#16
of 45 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,852,911 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,205 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 393,602 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 45 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.