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White-nose syndrome survivors do not exhibit frequent arousals associated with Pseudogymnoascus destructans infection

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Zoology, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
12 tweeters
facebook
7 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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33 Dimensions

Readers on

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98 Mendeley
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Title
White-nose syndrome survivors do not exhibit frequent arousals associated with Pseudogymnoascus destructans infection
Published in
Frontiers in Zoology, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12983-016-0143-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thomas Mikael Lilley, Joseph Samuel Johnson, Lasse Ruokolainen, Elisabeth Jeannine Rogers, Cali Ann Wilson, Spencer Mead Schell, Kenneth Alan Field, DeeAnn Marie Reeder

Abstract

White-nose syndrome (WNS) has devastated bat populations in North America, with millions of bats dead. WNS is associated with physiological changes in hibernating bats, leading to increased arousals from hibernation and premature consumption of fat reserves. However, there is evidence of surviving populations of little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus) close to where the fungus was first detected nearly ten years ago. We examined the hibernation patterns of a surviving population of little brown myotis and compared them to patterns in populations before the arrival of WNS and populations at the peak of WNS mortality. Despite infection with Pseudogymnoascus destructans, the causative fungal agent, the remnant population displayed less frequent arousals from torpor and lower torpid body temperatures than bats that died from WNS during the peak of mortality. The hibernation patterns of the remnant population resembled pre-WNS patterns with some modifications. These data show that remnant populations of little brown myotis do not experience the increase in periodic arousals from hibernation typified by bats dying from WNS, despite the presence of the fungal pathogen on their skin. These patterns may reflect the use of colder hibernacula microclimates by WNS survivors, and/or may reflect differences in how these bats respond to the disease.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 98 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Unknown 96 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 28 29%
Student > Bachelor 17 17%
Researcher 13 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 10%
Other 5 5%
Other 10 10%
Unknown 15 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 50 51%
Environmental Science 16 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 4%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 2%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 2%
Other 5 5%
Unknown 19 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 December 2018.
All research outputs
#1,903,498
of 18,963,610 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Zoology
#130
of 604 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#35,358
of 274,118 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Zoology
#2
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,963,610 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 604 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,118 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.