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Oxford Lithium Trial (OxLith) of the early affective, cognitive, neural and biochemical effects of lithium carbonate in bipolar disorder: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in Trials, March 2016
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

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130 Mendeley
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Title
Oxford Lithium Trial (OxLith) of the early affective, cognitive, neural and biochemical effects of lithium carbonate in bipolar disorder: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial
Published in
Trials, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13063-016-1230-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kate E. A. Saunders, Andrea Cipriani, Jennifer Rendell, Mary-Jane Attenburrow, Natalie Nelissen, Amy C. Bilderbeck, Sridhar R. Vasudevan, Grant Churchill, Guy M. Goodwin, Anna C. Nobre, Catherine J. Harmer, Paul J. Harrison, John R. Geddes

Abstract

Despite lithium's being the most effective drug for bipolar disorder and in clinical use for decades, we still know very little about its early effects relevant to its mode of action. The Oxford Lithium Trial is a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled study of 6-week lithium treatment in participants with bipolar disorder and mood instability. Its aim is to identify early clinical, neurocognitive and biological effects. Participants (n = 40) will undergo an intensive battery of multi-modal investigations, including remote monitoring of mood, activity and physiology, as well as cognitive testing, fMRI and magnetoencephalography, together with biochemical and gene expression measurements to assess renal, inflammatory and circadian effects. The findings derived from this trial may be of value in predicting subsequent therapeutic response or side effects, not only relevant to the use of lithium but also providing a potential signature to help in more rapid evaluation of novel mood stabilisers. In this respect, OxLith is a step towards the development of a valid experimental medicine model for bipolar disorder. ISRCTN91624955 . Registered on 22 January 2015.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 130 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 2%
Unknown 128 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 20 15%
Researcher 19 15%
Student > Bachelor 18 14%
Unspecified 10 8%
Student > Postgraduate 9 7%
Other 27 21%
Unknown 27 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 30 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 26 20%
Unspecified 11 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 7%
Neuroscience 7 5%
Other 16 12%
Unknown 31 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 March 2016.
All research outputs
#15,362,987
of 22,854,458 outputs
Outputs from Trials
#4,054
of 5,886 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#177,189
of 298,622 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Trials
#90
of 120 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,854,458 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,886 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.3. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,622 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 120 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.