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The prevalence of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae in a nursing home setting compared with elderly living at home: a cross-sectional comparison

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, March 2016
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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53 Mendeley
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Title
The prevalence of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae in a nursing home setting compared with elderly living at home: a cross-sectional comparison
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12879-016-1430-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andreas Blom, Jonas Ahl, Fredrik Månsson, Fredrik Resman, Johan Tham

Abstract

The aim of the study was to investigate the prevalence of faecal carriage of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae among residents living in nursing homes and to compare it with a corresponding group of elderly people living in their own homes. A total of 160 persons participated in the study between February and April 2014, 91 were residents in nursing homes (n = 10) and the remaining 69 were elderly living in their own homes. In addition to performing faecal samples, all participants answered a standardized questionnaire regarding known risk factors for ESBL-carriage. There was no significant difference between the groups, as 10 of the 91 (11 %) residents from nursing homes were ESBL-carriers compared with 6 of 69 (8,7 %) elderly living in their own homes. There was no significant difference between the groups. The total prevalence was 10 %. A univariate analysis revealed that the only studied risk factor significantly associated with ESBL-carriage was recent foreign travel (p = 0,017). All ESBL-positive isolates were Escherichia coli and there was a high degree of co-resistance to other antibiotics. All isolates (n = 17) were susceptible to imipenem and amikacin. Residents of nursing homes as well as elderly living in their own homes have high rates of faecal carriage of ESBL-producing bacteria. These findings may affect the choice of empirical antibiotic treatment of severe infections in older adults.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 53 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 17%
Student > Master 7 13%
Student > Bachelor 6 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 8%
Other 12 23%
Unknown 10 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 32%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 6%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Other 10 19%
Unknown 12 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 April 2021.
All research outputs
#5,611,288
of 17,831,129 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,764
of 6,281 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#89,172
of 273,126 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,831,129 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 67th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,281 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,126 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them