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Impact of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS‐CoV) on pregnancy and perinatal outcome

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
policy
1 policy source
twitter
62 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
143 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
212 Mendeley
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Title
Impact of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS‐CoV) on pregnancy and perinatal outcome
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12879-016-1437-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Haleema Alserehi, Ghassan Wali, Abeer Alshukairi, Basem Alraddadi

Abstract

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a viral respiratory disease. Most people infected with MERS-CoV develop severe acute respiratory illness. It was first reported in Saudi Arabia in 2012 and has since spread to several other countries. We report the clinical course of MERS-CoV infection in a pregnant woman who acquired the infection during the last trimester. The patient is a 33-year-old female working as a critical care nurse. She was 32 weeks pregnant when she presented with respiratory symptoms after direct contact with a MERS-COV patient. Although the patient was in respiratory failure, necessitated mechanical ventilation, and intensive care (ICU) admission, a healthy infant was delivered. The mother recovered. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a laboratory-confirmed Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus in a pregnant woman. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) known to cause severe acute respiratory illness associated with a high risk of mortality Various factors may have contributed to the successful outcome of this patient such as young age, presentation during the last stages of pregnancy, and possible differences in immune response.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 62 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 212 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 212 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 35 17%
Researcher 27 13%
Student > Bachelor 20 9%
Other 14 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 14 7%
Other 51 24%
Unknown 51 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 72 34%
Nursing and Health Professions 19 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 3%
Other 32 15%
Unknown 65 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 58. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 February 2021.
All research outputs
#595,750
of 22,135,342 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#133
of 7,484 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,544
of 281,474 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,135,342 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,484 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,474 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them