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Recruitment to doping and help-seeking behavior of eight female AAS users

Overview of attention for article published in Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy, March 2016
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Title
Recruitment to doping and help-seeking behavior of eight female AAS users
Published in
Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13011-016-0056-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Annica Börjesson, Nina Gårevik, Marja-Liisa Dahl, Anders Rane, Lena Ekström

Abstract

Doping with anabolic androgenic steroids in sports has now developed to a widespread use of these agents among young people outside the sport. This is of major concern to the society. The purpose of the use is mainly for aesthetic reasons and is seen as a male phenomenon. But use also occurs in women where the knowledge is scarce. Our aim was to identify the pattern of doping agents in eight female cases and compare them with similar data from men. Eight female users were recruited through Anti-Doping Hot-Line, a national telephone counseling service on doping issues during the years 1998-2004. The use was confirmed with urine doping analysis at the Doping Laboratory. The characteristic of use, co-use of narcotics/other doping agents, exercise pattern, adverse-side effects, family history and reason to begin was evaluated. The women used on average 1.9 different anabolic androgenic steroids and clenbuterol preparations. Ephedrine and growth hormone were co-used in five and one of the women, respectively. Three women reported co-use of narcotics (cannabis and cocaine). The average duration of anabolic agent use before contacting health care was 58 weeks (range 7-104). Side effects for anabolic androgenic steroids (n = 5) included voice changes, clitoral enlargement, body hair growth, whereas women using clenbuterol (n = 2) reported tachycardia and depression. All women except one had a man in close relationship encouraging them to begin with the doping agents. The use of doping agents in our eight women was different from that in male users. The women used less doping agents and were more prone to contact the health care, at an earlier stage, probably due to the adverse effects. The co-use with ephedrine, growth hormone and cannabis appeared to be in the same range as in men. This is the first study showing that a man in close relationship may motivate a woman to use anabolic agents.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 125 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 125 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 22 18%
Student > Master 19 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 11%
Researcher 10 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 8%
Other 23 18%
Unknown 27 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 25 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 17 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 9%
Social Sciences 11 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 6%
Other 20 16%
Unknown 34 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 March 2016.
All research outputs
#4,307,145
of 8,515,850 outputs
Outputs from Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy
#254
of 325 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#145,376
of 287,709 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy
#8
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,515,850 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 325 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 287,709 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.