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“I have surly passed a limit, it is simply too much”: women’s and men’s experiences of stress and wellbeing when living within a process of housework resignation

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, March 2016
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Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
47 Mendeley
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Title
“I have surly passed a limit, it is simply too much”: women’s and men’s experiences of stress and wellbeing when living within a process of housework resignation
Published in
BMC Public Health, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-2920-5
Pubmed ID
URN
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-118710
Authors

Lisa Harryson, Lena Aléx, Anne Hammarström

Abstract

Gender inequality within paid and unpaid work exposes women and men to different environments and responsibilities. These gender patterns shape living conditions for women and men, either negatively or positively, by affecting the prospect of good health. Most public health studies of gender and housework are quantitative, and knowledge about the relationship between housework experiences and health for women and men is limited. The aim of this study was to explore the housework experiences and practices of women and men and their experiences of stress and perceived wellbeing from a gender perspective. We conducted thematic interviews with four women and four men living in Sweden, and performed an analysis using the Grounded Theory method. We found that stereotypical gender practices in housework influenced experiences of stress and perceived wellbeing among women and men. Despite proposing gender equality in housework as a means of improving wellbeing, inequality was amplified by the way women and men handle the gendered division of housework. We call this recurring theme "The process of housework resignation", which also constitute the core category in our analysis. "The process of housework resignation" was theorised from the categories "Gender practices in housework", "Experiencing stress and wellbeing" and "Managing daily life". Stereotypical gender practices in housework can increase experiences of stress among women and men. Challenging stereotypical masculinities can be a key for breaking the process of resignation in housework and for facilitating improved health among both women and men in heterosexual couple relationships within a Swedish context.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 46 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 21%
Student > Bachelor 10 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 11%
Student > Postgraduate 3 6%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 5 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 11 23%
Social Sciences 8 17%
Psychology 7 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 6%
Arts and Humanities 3 6%
Other 8 17%
Unknown 7 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 April 2016.
All research outputs
#3,491,030
of 7,625,034 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#4,239
of 6,626 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#128,297
of 280,845 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#134
of 216 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,625,034 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 51st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,626 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.4. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,845 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 216 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.