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Curve progression 25 years after bracing for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: long term comparative results between two matched groups of 18 versus 23 hours daily bracing

Overview of attention for article published in Scoliosis and Spinal Disorders, March 2016
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Title
Curve progression 25 years after bracing for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: long term comparative results between two matched groups of 18 versus 23 hours daily bracing
Published in
Scoliosis and Spinal Disorders, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13013-016-0065-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stavros Pellios, Eustathios Kenanidis, Michael Potoupnis, Eleftherios Tsiridis, Fares E. Sayegh, John Kirkos, George A. Kapetanos

Abstract

Scoliotic curves do not necessarily stop progressing at skeletal maturity. The factors that influence curve behavior following bracing are not fully determined. Our objectives were to evaluate the loss of the scoliotic curve correction in a cohort of patients treated with bracing during adolescence and to compare the outcomes of 18 versus 23 h of bracing at a mean of 25 years post brace removal. Seventy-seven patients, who were successfully treated for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis with Βoston brace, were re-evaluated 25 years after the end of their treatment. Patients were further divided in 2 matched groups; those wearing the brace for 23 h and those not wearing the brace at school-time, limiting the application of the brace to 18 h. The mean scoliotic curve was compared between groups before, during, just after bracing and 25 years post bracing. Validated in patients' native language forms of Short Form 36 and Oswestry Disability Index questionnaires were used to compare the quality of life between groups 25 years post bracing. The mean age of the cohort was 40.4 (±3.2) years. They underwent long term follow up at a mean of 25.16 (±2.69) years after brace removal. The mean cohort scoliotic curve increased by 3.9 (±6.69) at 25 years since brace removal. There was however no significant difference in the mean Cobb angle of the cohort between pre brace and long term follow up period (p = 0.307). The 18 and 23 h application groups were comparable according to demographics and several bracing and scoliotic curve parameters. There was no significant difference in the mean curve magnitude between 18 and 23 h application groups at brace removal (p = 0.512) and at 25 years follow-up (p = 0.878). There was also no significant difference in the mean score of Quality of Life questionnaires between groups at long term follow up. Scoliotic curves do not necessarily stop progressing after bracing. Bracing is effective treatment method with good long term results in appropriate patients. Since compliance was not objectively measured, we don't feel confident to give any indication about everyday dosage.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 40 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 15%
Other 5 13%
Student > Postgraduate 4 10%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Other 9 23%
Unknown 6 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 45%
Engineering 4 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 5%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 7 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 March 2016.
All research outputs
#5,492,264
of 9,727,301 outputs
Outputs from Scoliosis and Spinal Disorders
#32
of 32 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#158,797
of 288,081 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scoliosis and Spinal Disorders
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,727,301 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 32 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one scored the same or higher as 0 of them.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 288,081 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.