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Photoreceptor proliferation and dysregulation of cell cycle genes in early onset inherited retinal degenerations

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#16 of 5,731)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
10 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
31 Mendeley
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Title
Photoreceptor proliferation and dysregulation of cell cycle genes in early onset inherited retinal degenerations
Published in
BMC Genomics, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12864-016-2477-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kristin L. Gardiner, Louise Downs, Agnes I. Berta-Antalics, Evelyn Santana, Gustavo D. Aguirre, Sem Genini

Abstract

Mitotic terminally differentiated photoreceptors (PRs) are observed in early retinal degeneration (erd), an inherited canine retinal disease driven by mutations in the NDR kinase STK38L (NDR2). We demonstrate that a similar proliferative response, but of lower magnitude, occurs in two other early onset disease models, X-linked progressive retinal atrophy 2 (xlpra2) and rod cone dysplasia 1 (rcd1). Proliferating cells are rod PRs, and not microglia or Müller cells. Expression of the cell cycle related genes RB1 and E2F1 as well as CDK2,4,6 was up-regulated, but changes were mutation-specific. Changes in cyclin expression differed across all genes, diseases and time points analyzed, although CCNA1 and CCNE1 expression increased with age in the three models suggesting that there is a dysregulation of cell cycle gene expression in all three diseases. Unique to erd, however, are mutation-specific changes in the expression of NDR kinases and Hippo signaling members with increased expression of MOB1 and LATS1 in the newly generated hybrid rod/S-cones. Our data raise the intriguing possibility that terminally differentiated normal PRs are kept from dividing by NDR2-MOB1 interaction. Furthermore, they provide the framework for the selection of candidate genes for further investigation as potential targets of therapy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 35%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 13%
Student > Postgraduate 3 10%
Student > Bachelor 3 10%
Student > Master 2 6%
Other 5 16%
Unknown 3 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 35%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 26%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 13%
Engineering 2 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 4 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 83. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 March 2016.
All research outputs
#98,683
of 8,025,817 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#16
of 5,731 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,229
of 282,083 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#1
of 218 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,025,817 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,731 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,083 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 218 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.