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Climate change projections of West Nile virus infections in Europe: implications for blood safety practices

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Health, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
policy
1 policy source
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
47 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
137 Mendeley
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Title
Climate change projections of West Nile virus infections in Europe: implications for blood safety practices
Published in
Environmental Health, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12940-016-0105-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jan C. Semenza, Annelise Tran, Laura Espinosa, Bertrand Sudre, Dragoslav Domanovic, Shlomit Paz

Abstract

West Nile virus (WNV) is transmitted by mosquitoes in both urban as well as in rural environments and can be pathogenic in birds, horses and humans. Extrinsic factors such as temperature and land use are determinants of WNV outbreaks in Europe, along with intrinsic factors of the vector and virus. With a multivariate model for WNV transmission we computed the probability of WNV infection in 2014, with July 2014 temperature anomalies. We applied the July temperature anomalies under the balanced A1B climate change scenario (mix of all energy sources, fossil and non-fossil) for 2025 and 2050 to model and project the risk of WNV infection in the future. Since asymptomatic infections are common in humans (which can result in the contamination of the donated blood) we estimated the predictive prevalence of WNV infections in the blood donor population. External validation of the probability model with 2014 cases indicated good prediction, based on an Area Under Curve (AUC) of 0.871 (SD = 0.032), on the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (ROC). The climate change projections for 2025 reveal a higher probability of WNV infection particularly at the edges of the current transmission areas (for example in Eastern Croatia, Northeastern and Northwestern Turkey) and an even further expansion in 2050. The prevalence of infection in (blood donor) populations in the outbreak-affected districts is expected to expand in the future. Predictive modelling of environmental and climatic drivers of WNV can be a valuable tool for public health practice. It can help delineate districts at risk for future transmission. These areas can be subjected to integrated disease and vector surveillance, outreach to the public and health care providers, implementation of personal protective measures, screening of blood donors, and vector abatement activities.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 137 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 1%
Germany 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 133 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 27 20%
Student > Master 24 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 13%
Student > Bachelor 11 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 4%
Other 18 13%
Unknown 33 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 20 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 5%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 6 4%
Other 28 20%
Unknown 43 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 June 2020.
All research outputs
#1,626,842
of 20,568,640 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Health
#343
of 1,415 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,227
of 323,341 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,568,640 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,415 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 30.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 323,341 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them