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Mechanism and Regulation of Nucleocytoplasmic Trafficking of Smad

Overview of attention for article published in Cell & Bioscience, December 2011
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Title
Mechanism and Regulation of Nucleocytoplasmic Trafficking of Smad
Published in
Cell & Bioscience, December 2011
DOI 10.1186/2045-3701-1-40
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xiaochu Chen, Xiaochu Chen, Lan Xu

Abstract

Smad proteins are the intracellular mediators of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signaling. Smads function as transcription factors and their activities require carboxyl-terminal phosphorylation by TGF-β receptor kinases which are embedded in the cell membrane. Therefore, the translocation of activated Smads from the cytoplasm into the nucleus is a rate-limiting step in TGF-β signal transduction into the nucleus. On the other hand, the export of Smads out of the nucleus turns off TGF-β effect. Such spatial control of Smad ensures a tight regulation of TGF-β target genes. Several cross-talk pathways have been shown to affect TGF-β signaling by impairing nuclear translocation of Smad, exemplifying the biological importance of the nuclear transport process. Many laboratories have investigated the underlying molecular mechanism of Smad nucleocytoplasmic translocation, combining genetics, biochemistry and sophisticated live cell imaging approaches. The last few years have witnessed the elucidation of several key players in Smad nuclear transport, most importantly the karyopherins that carry Smads across the nuclear envelope and nuclear pore proteins that facilitate the trans-nuclear envelope movement. The foundation is now set to further elucidate how the nuclear transport process is regulated and exploit such knowledge to manipulate TGF-β signaling. In this review we will discuss the current understanding of the molecular machinery responsible for nuclear import and export of Smads.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
France 2 3%
Sweden 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 59 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 25%
Researcher 14 22%
Student > Master 9 14%
Student > Postgraduate 6 9%
Student > Bachelor 6 9%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 9 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 35%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 15 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 15%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 3%
Engineering 2 3%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 11 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 February 2012.
All research outputs
#15,242,272
of 22,663,150 outputs
Outputs from Cell & Bioscience
#378
of 914 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#162,933
of 243,693 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cell & Bioscience
#5
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,663,150 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 914 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 243,693 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.