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Parental Attitudes to Genetic Testing Differ by Ethnicity and Immigration in Childhood Nephrotic Syndrome: A Cross-Sectional Study

Overview of attention for article published in Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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25 Mendeley
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Title
Parental Attitudes to Genetic Testing Differ by Ethnicity and Immigration in Childhood Nephrotic Syndrome: A Cross-Sectional Study
Published in
Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40697-016-0104-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karlota Borges, Jovanka Vasilevska-Ristovska, Neesha Hussain-Shamsy, Viral Patel, Tonny Banh, Diane Hebert, Rachel J. Pearl, Seetha Radhakrishnan, Tino D. Piscione, Christoph P. B. Licht, Valerie Langlois, Leo Levin, Lisa Strug, Rulan S. Parekh

Abstract

Studies in the USA report differences in opinion among parents of different ethnic groups toward genetic testing for their child; however, there are no studies that address this issue in the diverse ethnic and immigrant population in Canada. This study aims to determine whether ethnicity and immigration status influences parental interest in clinical genetic testing for a potentially progressive kidney disease. This is a cross-sectional study. Participants were recruited from the Greater Toronto Area, Canada. The study included 320 parents of children ages 1-18 years with nephrotic syndrome enrolled in the Insight into Nephrotic Syndrome: Investigating Genes, Health and Therapeutics (INSIGHT) observational cohort study. Demographic, ethnicity, immigration, and child specific factors as well as interest in genetic testing were collected through self-reported questionnaires administered at baseline study visit. Logistic regression models were used to examine association of ethnicity and immigration status with interest in genetic testing. The majority of parents (85 %) were interested in genetic testing for their child. South Asian and East/Southeast Asian parents had 74 and 76 % lower odds of agreeing to genetic testing when compared to Europeans (odds ratio (OR) 0.26, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.10-0.68; OR 0.24, 95 % CI 0.07-0.79, respectively) after controlling for age and sex of child, age and education level of parent, initial steroid resistance, and duration of time in Canada. Immigrants to Canada also had significantly lower odds (OR 0.29, 95 % CI 0.12-0.72) of agreeing to genetic testing after similar adjustment. Higher education level was not associated with greater interest in genetic testing (OR 1.24, 95 % CI 0.64-2.42). Participants have already agreed to aggregate genetic testing for research purposes as part of enrolment in INSIGHT study. While majority of parents were interested in genetic testing for their child, immigrants, particularly South Asians and East/Southeast Asians, were more likely to decline genetic testing. Genetic counseling needs to be tailored to address specific concerns in these parental groups to maximize informed decision-making in the clinical setting. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01605266.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 20%
Student > Master 5 20%
Professor 2 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 4%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 3 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 16%
Psychology 2 8%
Social Sciences 2 8%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 6 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 June 2016.
All research outputs
#9,793,762
of 17,687,978 outputs
Outputs from Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease
#241
of 384 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#117,632
of 273,244 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,687,978 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 384 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,244 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them