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Frequent mismatch-repair defects link prostate cancer to Lynch syndrome

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Urology, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#22 of 193)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet

Citations

dimensions_citation
42 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
54 Mendeley
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Title
Frequent mismatch-repair defects link prostate cancer to Lynch syndrome
Published in
BMC Urology, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12894-016-0130-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mev Dominguez-Valentin, Patrick Joost, Christina Therkildsen, Mats Jonsson, Eva Rambech, Mef Nilbert

Abstract

A possible role for prostate cancer in Lynch syndrome has been debated based on observations of mismatch-repair defective tumors and reports of an increased risk of prostate cancer in mutation carriers. Potential inclusion of prostate cancer in the Lynch syndrome tumor spectrum is relevant for family classification, risk estimates and surveillance recommendations in mutation carriers. We used the population-based Danish HNPCC-register to identify all prostate cancers that developed in mutation carriers and in their first-degree relatives from 288 Lynch syndrome families. The tumors were evaluated for clinicopathologic features and mismatch-repair status, and the cumulative risk of prostate cancer was determined. In total, 28 prostate cancers developed in 16 mutation carriers and in 12 first-degree relatives at a median age of 63 years. The majority of the tumors were high-grade tumors with Gleason scores 8-10. Prostate cancer was associated with mutations in MSH2, MLH1 and MSH6 with loss of the respective mismatch repair protein in 69 % of the tumors, though a MSI-high phenotype was restricted to 13 % of the tumors. The cumulative risk of prostate cancer at age 70 was 3.7 % (95 % CI: 2.3-4.9). We provide evidence to link prostate cancer to Lynch syndrome through demonstration of MMR defective tumors and an increased risk of the disease, which suggests that prostate cancer should be considered in the diagnostic work-up of Lynch syndrome.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 54 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 19%
Researcher 9 17%
Student > Bachelor 9 17%
Student > Master 7 13%
Student > Postgraduate 3 6%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 9 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 37%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 11%
Engineering 3 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 12 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 March 2016.
All research outputs
#1,011,516
of 7,435,912 outputs
Outputs from BMC Urology
#22
of 193 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#55,199
of 275,322 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Urology
#1
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,435,912 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 193 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,322 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them