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A qualitative evaluation of the impact of a palliative care course on preregistration nursing students’ practice in Cameroon

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Palliative Care, March 2016
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Title
A qualitative evaluation of the impact of a palliative care course on preregistration nursing students’ practice in Cameroon
Published in
BMC Palliative Care, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12904-016-0106-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nahyeni Bassah, Karen Cox, Jane Seymour

Abstract

Current evidence suggests that palliative care education can improve preregistration nursing students' competencies in palliative care. However, it is not known whether these competencies are translated into students' practice in the care of patients who are approaching the end of life. This paper seeks to contribute to the palliative care evidence base by examining how nursing students in receipt of education report transfer of learning to practice, and what the barriers and facilitators may be, in a resource-poor country. We utilised focus groups and individual critical incident interviews to explore nursing students' palliative care learning transfer. Three focus groups, consisting of 23 participants and 10 individual critical incident interviews were conducted with preregistration nursing student who had attended a palliative care course in Cameroon and had experience caring for a patient approaching the end of life. Data was analysed thematically, using the framework approach. The results suggest that nursing students in receipt of palliative care education can transfer their learning to practice. Students reported recognizing patients with palliative care needs, providing patients with physical, psychosocial and spiritual support and communicating patient information to the wider care team. They did however perceive some barriers to this transfer which were either related to themselves, qualified nurses, the practice setting or family caregivers and patients. The findings from this study suggest that nursing student in receipt of palliative care education can use their learning in practice to provide care to patients and their families approaching the end of life. Nevertheless, these findings need to be treated with some caution given the self-reported nature of the data. Demonstrating the link between preregistration palliative care education and patient care is vital to ensuring that newly acquired knowledge and skills are translated and embedded into clinical practice. This study also has implications for advocating for palliative care policies and adequately preparing clinical placement sites for students' learning and transfer of learning.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 189 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Jamaica 1 <1%
Unknown 188 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 24 13%
Student > Bachelor 20 11%
Researcher 17 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 6%
Lecturer 10 5%
Other 40 21%
Unknown 66 35%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 66 35%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 11%
Social Sciences 9 5%
Psychology 7 4%
Computer Science 4 2%
Other 14 7%
Unknown 68 36%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 September 2016.
All research outputs
#15,690,772
of 23,316,003 outputs
Outputs from BMC Palliative Care
#1,106
of 1,270 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#182,167
of 302,185 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Palliative Care
#27
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,316,003 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,270 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.5. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 302,185 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.