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Improved eating behaviours mediate weight gain prevention of young adults: moderation and mediation results of a randomised controlled trial of TXT2BFiT, mHealth program

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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19 tweeters

Citations

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26 Dimensions

Readers on

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243 Mendeley
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Title
Improved eating behaviours mediate weight gain prevention of young adults: moderation and mediation results of a randomised controlled trial of TXT2BFiT, mHealth program
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0368-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stephanie R. Partridge, Kevin McGeechan, Adrian Bauman, Philayrath Phongsavan, Margaret Allman-Farinelli

Abstract

Explanatory evaluation of interventions for prevention of weight gain is required beyond changes in weight, to determine for whom the intervention works and the underlying mechanisms of change. It was hypothesised that participant characteristics moderate intervention effect on weight change and improved eating and physical activity behaviours during the 3-month program mediate the relationship between intervention and weight. In our randomised controlled trial, young adults at risk of weight gain (n = 250) were assigned either to an intervention group that received a 3-month mHealth (TXT2BFiT) program with 6-month maintenance or to a control group. Data were collected via online self-report surveys. Hypothesised moderators and mediators of the intervention effect on weight were independently assessed in PROCESS macro models for 3 and 9-month weight change. Males (P = 0.01), mid-20s age group (P = 0.04), and higher income earners (P = 0.02) moderated intervention effects on weight change at 3-months and males only at 9-months (P = 0.02). Weight change at 3 (-1.12 kg) and 9-months (-1.38 kg) remained significant when 3-month nutrition and physical activity behaviours were specified as mediators (P <0.01 and P = 0.01 respectively). Indirect paths explained 39 % (0.72/1.85 kg) and 40 % (0.92/2.3 kg) of total effect on weight change at 3 and 9-months respectively. Increased vegetable intake by intervention group at 3-months accounted for 19 and 17 % and decreased sugar-sweetened beverages accounted for 8 and 13 % of indirect weight change effects at 3 and 9-months respectively. TXT2BFiT was effective for both young men and women. Small sustained behavioural changes, including increased vegetable intake and decreased sugar-sweetened beverages consumption significantly mediated the intervention's effects on weight change. Improved eating behaviours and increased physical activity accounted for approximately 40 % of the weight change. The trial is registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ( ACTRN12612000924853 ).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 19 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 243 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Unknown 241 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 40 16%
Student > Bachelor 33 14%
Researcher 31 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 17 7%
Other 37 15%
Unknown 57 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 41 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 39 16%
Psychology 28 12%
Sports and Recreations 13 5%
Social Sciences 10 4%
Other 39 16%
Unknown 73 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 November 2017.
All research outputs
#1,654,992
of 15,223,376 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#744
of 1,514 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,595
of 265,695 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#8
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,223,376 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,514 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,695 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.