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Quantification of the smoking-associated cancer risk with rate advancement periods: meta-analysis of individual participant data from cohorts of the CHANCES consortium

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
34 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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79 Dimensions

Readers on

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194 Mendeley
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Title
Quantification of the smoking-associated cancer risk with rate advancement periods: meta-analysis of individual participant data from cohorts of the CHANCES consortium
Published in
BMC Medicine, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12916-016-0607-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

José Manuel Ordóñez-Mena, Ben Schöttker, Ute Mons, Mazda Jenab, Heinz Freisling, Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, Mark G. O’Doherty, Angela Scott, Frank Kee, Bruno H. Stricker, Albert Hofman, Catherine E. de Keyser, Rikje Ruiter, Stefan Söderberg, Pekka Jousilahti, Kari Kuulasmaa, Neal D. Freedman, Tom Wilsgaard, Lisette CPGM de Groot, Ellen Kampman, Niclas Håkansson, Nicola Orsini, Alicja Wolk, Lena Maria Nilsson, Anne Tjønneland, Andrzej Pająk, Sofia Malyutina, Růžena Kubínová, Abdonas Tamosiunas, Martin Bobak, Michail Katsoulis, Philippos Orfanos, Paolo Boffetta, Antonia Trichopoulou, Hermann Brenner

Abstract

Smoking is the most important individual risk factor for many cancer sites but its association with breast and prostate cancer is not entirely clear. Rate advancement periods (RAPs) may enhance communication of smoking related risk to the general population. Thus, we estimated RAPs for the association of smoking exposure (smoking status, time since smoking cessation, smoking intensity, and duration) with total and site-specific (lung, breast, colorectal, prostate, gastric, head and neck, and pancreatic) cancer incidence and mortality. This is a meta-analysis of 19 population-based prospective cohort studies with individual participant data for 897,021 European and American adults. For each cohort we calculated hazard ratios (HRs) for the association of smoking exposure with cancer outcomes using Cox regression adjusted for a common set of the most important potential confounding variables. RAPs (in years) were calculated as the ratio of the logarithms of the HRs for a given smoking exposure variable and age. Meta-analyses were employed to summarize cohort-specific HRs and RAPs. Overall, 140,205 subjects had a first incident cancer, and 53,164 died from cancer, during an average follow-up of 12 years. Current smoking advanced the overall risk of developing and dying from cancer by eight and ten years, respectively, compared with never smokers. The greatest advancements in cancer risk and mortality were seen for lung cancer and the least for breast cancer. Smoking cessation was statistically significantly associated with delays in the risk of cancer development and mortality compared with continued smoking. This investigation shows that smoking, even among older adults, considerably advances, and cessation delays, the risk of developing and dying from cancer. These findings may be helpful in more effectively communicating the harmful effects of smoking and the beneficial effect of smoking cessation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 34 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 194 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Sweden 1 <1%
Unknown 193 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 31 16%
Student > Master 24 12%
Other 17 9%
Student > Bachelor 15 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 6%
Other 38 20%
Unknown 57 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 66 34%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 3%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 3%
Other 28 14%
Unknown 69 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 31. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 December 2021.
All research outputs
#945,779
of 20,494,250 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#696
of 3,028 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18,958
of 278,260 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,494,250 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,028 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 39.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,260 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them