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Quaternary structure of a G-protein-coupled receptor heterotetramer in complex with Gi and Gs

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biology, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
6 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
89 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
92 Mendeley
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Title
Quaternary structure of a G-protein-coupled receptor heterotetramer in complex with Gi and Gs
Published in
BMC Biology, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12915-016-0247-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gemma Navarro, Arnau Cordomí, Monika Zelman-Femiak, Marc Brugarolas, Estefania Moreno, David Aguinaga, Laura Perez-Benito, Antoni Cortés, Vicent Casadó, Josefa Mallol, Enric I. Canela, Carme Lluís, Leonardo Pardo, Ana J. García-Sáez, Peter J. McCormick, Rafael Franco

Abstract

G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), in the form of monomers or homodimers that bind heterotrimeric G proteins, are fundamental in the transfer of extracellular stimuli to intracellular signaling pathways. Different GPCRs may also interact to form heteromers that are novel signaling units. Despite the exponential growth in the number of solved GPCR crystal structures, the structural properties of heteromers remain unknown. We used single-particle tracking experiments in cells expressing functional adenosine A1-A2A receptors fused to fluorescent proteins to show the loss of Brownian movement of the A1 receptor in the presence of the A2A receptor, and a preponderance of cell surface 2:2 receptor heteromers (dimer of dimers). Using computer modeling, aided by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer assays to monitor receptor homomerization and heteromerization and G-protein coupling, we predict the interacting interfaces and propose a quaternary structure of the GPCR tetramer in complex with two G proteins. The combination of results points to a molecular architecture formed by a rhombus-shaped heterotetramer, which is bound to two different interacting heterotrimeric G proteins (Gi and Gs). These novel results constitute an important advance in understanding the molecular intricacies involved in GPCR function.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 92 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
Denmark 1 1%
Switzerland 1 1%
Unknown 89 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 18 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 18%
Student > Master 12 13%
Student > Bachelor 9 10%
Professor 6 7%
Other 19 21%
Unknown 11 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 25 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 22%
Chemistry 9 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 8%
Neuroscience 6 7%
Other 8 9%
Unknown 17 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 October 2018.
All research outputs
#1,489,870
of 13,599,972 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biology
#480
of 1,192 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#39,772
of 262,369 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,599,972 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,192 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,369 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them