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The inhibition of microRNAs by HIV-1 Tat suppresses beta catenin activity in astrocytes

Overview of attention for article published in Retrovirology, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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16 Mendeley
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Title
The inhibition of microRNAs by HIV-1 Tat suppresses beta catenin activity in astrocytes
Published in
Retrovirology, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12977-016-0256-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Luca Sardo, Priyal R. Vakil, Weam Elbezanti, Anas El-Sayed, Zachary Klase

Abstract

Long term infection with HIV-1, even in the context of therapy, leads to chronic health problems including an array of neurocognitive dysfunctions. The viral Tat protein has previously been implicated in neuropathogenesis through its effect on astrocytes. Tat has also been shown to inhibit the biogenesis of miRNAs by inhibiting the activity of the cellular Dicer protein in an RNA dependent fashion. Whether there is a mechanistic connection between the ability of HIV-1 Tat to alter miRNAs and its observed effects on cells of the central nervous system has not been well examined. Here, we examined the ability of HIV-1 Tat to bind to and inhibit the production of over 300 cellular miRNAs. We found that the Tat protein only binds to and inhibits a fraction of the total cellular miRNAs. By mapping the downstream targets of these miRNAs we have determined a possible role for Tat alterations of miRNAs in the development of neuropathogenesis. Specifically, this work points to suppression of miRNAs function as the mechanism for Tat suppression of β-catenin activity. The discovery that HIV-1 Tat inhibits only a fraction of miRNAs opens new areas of research regarding changes in cellular pathways through suppression of RNA interference. Our initial analysis strongly suggests that these pathways may contribute to HIV-1 disruption of the central nervous system.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 6%
Unknown 15 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 31%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 19%
Student > Postgraduate 2 13%
Student > Master 2 13%
Student > Bachelor 1 6%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 1 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 19%
Neuroscience 2 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 6%
Other 3 19%
Unknown 1 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 April 2016.
All research outputs
#3,026,592
of 11,226,455 outputs
Outputs from Retrovirology
#154
of 545 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#92,026
of 282,057 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Retrovirology
#5
of 23 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,226,455 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 545 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,057 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.