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Prevalence of anaemia and associated risk factors among pregnant women attending antenatal care in Gulu and Hoima Regional Hospitals in Uganda: A cross sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, April 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 news outlet
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2 X users

Citations

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55 Dimensions

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570 Mendeley
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Title
Prevalence of anaemia and associated risk factors among pregnant women attending antenatal care in Gulu and Hoima Regional Hospitals in Uganda: A cross sectional study
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12884-016-0865-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gerald Obai, Pancras Odongo, Ronald Wanyama

Abstract

Anaemia is a public health problem affecting over 1.62 billion people globally. It affects all age groups of people and is particularly more prevalent in pregnant women. Africa carries a high burden of anaemia; in Uganda 24 % of women of child bearing age have anaemia. Pregnant women living in poverty are at greater risk of developing iron deficiency anaemia. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of anaemia and the associated risk factors in pregnant women attending antenatal care at Gulu and Hoima Regional Hospitals in Northern and Western Uganda respectively. We conducted a cross sectional study in Gulu and Hoima Regional Hospitals from July to October 2012. Our study participants were pregnant women attending antenatal care. Socio-demographic data were collected using structured questionnaires and blood samples were collected for haemoglobin estimation. Haemoglobin concentration was determined using an automated analyzer closed mode of blood sampling. Data were analysed using Stata version 12. Odds ratio was used as a measure of association, with 95 % confidence interval; and independent risk factors for anaemia were investigated using logistic regression analyses. Ethical approval was obtained from Gulu University Research Ethics Committee and written informed consent was obtained from each study participant. The overall prevalence of anaemia was 22.1 %; higher in Gulu (32.9 %) than in Hoima (12.1 %), p < 0.001. In Gulu, the prevalence of mild anaemia was 23 %, moderate anaemia was 9 %, and severe anaemia was 0.8 %, while in Hoima, the prevalence of mild anaemia was 9 %, moderate anaemia was 2.5 %, and severe anaemia was 0.5 %. Independent risk factors for anaemia were: being a housewife [Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) = 1.7, 95 % CI: 1.05-2.68]; and being a resident in Gulu (AOR = 3.6, 95 % CI: 2.41-5.58). The prevalence of anaemia in pregnant women in Gulu is higher than in Hoima. Amongst pregnancy women, being a housewife is an independent risk factor for anaemia. Greater efforts are required to encourage early antenatal attendance from women in these at risk groups. This would allow iron and folic acid supplementation during pregnancy, which would potentially reduce the prevalence of anaemia.

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The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 570 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Nigeria 1 <1%
Zimbabwe 1 <1%
Unknown 568 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 101 18%
Student > Master 92 16%
Lecturer 29 5%
Student > Postgraduate 25 4%
Researcher 16 3%
Other 49 9%
Unknown 258 45%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 136 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 91 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 3%
Social Sciences 16 3%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 9 2%
Other 39 7%
Unknown 263 46%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 November 2023.
All research outputs
#3,303,391
of 24,796,946 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#906
of 4,624 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#51,149
of 306,873 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#21
of 69 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 24,796,946 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,624 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 306,873 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 69 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.