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Risk factors assessment for nasal colonization of Staphylococcus aureus and its methicillin resistant strains among pre-clinical medical students of Nepal

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, April 2016
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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28 Dimensions

Readers on

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101 Mendeley
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Title
Risk factors assessment for nasal colonization of Staphylococcus aureus and its methicillin resistant strains among pre-clinical medical students of Nepal
Published in
BMC Research Notes, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13104-016-2021-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shamshul Ansari, Rajendra Gautam, Sony Shrestha, Safiur Rahman Ansari, Shankar Nanda Subedi, Muni Raj Chhetri

Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), a normal flora of nasal cavity, can cause minor to life threatening invasive diseases and nosocomial infections. Methicillin resistant strains of S. aureus are causing a great challenge for treatment options. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the nasal carriage rate of S. aureus, its methicillin resistant strains and risk factors in medical students prior to clinical exposure. The bacterial growth of S. aureus from nasal swab culture was identified by using standard microbiological methods recommended by American Society for Microbiology. Modified Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method was used for antibiotic susceptibility testing and methicillin resistance was confirmed using cefoxitin and oxacillin disks. D-zone test method was used to determine the inducible clindamycin resistance. Among 200 participants, nasal carriage of S. aureus was detected from 30 (15 %) subjects. Upper respiratory tract infections significantly (P < 0.05) contributed the carriage of S. aureus and their methicillin resistant strains. All of the isolates were reported to be susceptible to vancomycin and teicoplanin. S. aureus strains detected from 8 (4 %) students were confirmed to be methicillin resistant. The result of our study demands for strict policy to screen all the students for nasal carriage of S. aureus and its MRSA strains to minimize the transmission of this organism from community to hospital settings.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 101 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Korea, Republic of 1 <1%
Unknown 100 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 21 21%
Student > Bachelor 16 16%
Researcher 12 12%
Lecturer 6 6%
Student > Postgraduate 6 6%
Other 10 10%
Unknown 30 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 19 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 18 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 4%
Other 9 9%
Unknown 34 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 December 2016.
All research outputs
#17,797,589
of 22,862,742 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#2,831
of 4,267 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#206,375
of 300,876 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#69
of 103 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,862,742 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,267 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 300,876 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 103 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.