↓ Skip to main content

Widespread horizontal genomic exchange does not erode species barriers among sympatric ducks

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2012
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
58 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
45 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
88 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Widespread horizontal genomic exchange does not erode species barriers among sympatric ducks
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2012
DOI 10.1186/1471-2148-12-45
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robert HS Kraus, Hindrik HD Kerstens, Pim van Hooft, Hendrik-Jan Megens, Johan Elmberg, Arseny Tsvey, Dmitry Sartakov, Sergej A Soloviev, Richard PMA Crooijmans, Martien AM Groenen, Ronald C Ydenberg, Herbert HT Prins

Abstract

The study of speciation and maintenance of species barriers is at the core of evolutionary biology. During speciation the genome of one population becomes separated from other populations of the same species, which may lead to genomic incompatibility with time. This separation is complete when no fertile offspring is produced from inter-population matings, which is the basis of the biological species concept. Birds, in particular ducks, are recognised as a challenging and illustrative group of higher vertebrates for speciation studies. There are many sympatric and ecologically similar duck species, among which fertile hybrids occur relatively frequently in nature, yet these species remain distinct.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 58 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 88 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 3 3%
United States 2 2%
Italy 1 1%
Netherlands 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 79 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 27%
Researcher 20 23%
Student > Master 14 16%
Professor 5 6%
Other 5 6%
Other 12 14%
Unknown 8 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 66 75%
Environmental Science 4 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 5%
Physics and Astronomy 2 2%
Arts and Humanities 1 1%
Other 2 2%
Unknown 9 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 35. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 September 2016.
All research outputs
#878,007
of 21,332,163 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#171
of 2,902 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,606
of 141,507 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,332,163 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,902 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 141,507 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them