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Lung complications are common in intensive care treated patients with pelvis fractures: a retrospective cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)

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6 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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6 Dimensions

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53 Mendeley
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Title
Lung complications are common in intensive care treated patients with pelvis fractures: a retrospective cohort study
Published in
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13049-016-0244-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joakim Engström, Henrik Reinius, Jennie Ström, Monica Frick Bergström, Ing-Marie Larsson, Anders Larsson, Tomas Borg

Abstract

The incidence of severe respiratory complications in patients with pelvis fractures needing intensive care have not previously been studied. Therefore, the aims of this registry study were to 1) determine the number of ICU patients with pelvis fractures who had severe respiratory complications 2) whether the surgical intervention in these patients is associated with the pulmonary condition and 3) whether there is an association between lung complications and mortality. We hypothesized that acute hypoxic failure (AHF) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) 1) are common in ICU treated patients with pelvis fractures, 2) are not related to the reconstructive surgery, or to 3) to mortality. All patients in the database cohort (n = 112), scheduled for surgical stabilization of pelvis ring and/or acetabulum fractures, admitted to the general ICU at Uppsala University Hospital between 2007 and 2014 for intensive care were included. The incidence of AHF/ARDS was 67 % (75/112 patients), i.e., the percentage of patients that at any period during the ICU stay fulfilled the AHF/ARDS criteria. The incidence of AHF was 44 % and incidence of ARDS was 23 %. The patients with AHF/ARDS had more lung contusions and pneumonia than the patients without AHF/ARDS. Overall, there were no significant changes in oxygenation variables associated with surgery. However, 23 patients with pre-operative normal lung status developed AHF/ARDS in relation to the surgical procedure, whereas 12 patients with AHF/ARDS normalized their lung condition. The patients who developed AHF/ARDS had a higher incidence of lung contusion (P = 0.04) and the surgical stabilization was performed earlier (5 versus 10 days) in these patients (P = 0.03). We found that the incidence of respiratory failure in ICU treated patients with pelvis fractures was high, that the procedure around surgical stabilization seems to be associated with a worsening in the respiratory function in patients with lung contusion, and that mortality was low and was probably not related to the respiratory condition. Study was registered at ISRCTN.org number, ISRCTN10335587 .

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Andorra 1 2%
Unknown 52 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 21%
Student > Bachelor 8 15%
Other 5 9%
Student > Master 4 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 4%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 16 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 51%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Engineering 2 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 15 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 April 2016.
All research outputs
#5,350,146
of 17,359,532 outputs
Outputs from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#502
of 1,055 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#87,994
of 269,632 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,359,532 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 69th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,055 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,632 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them