↓ Skip to main content

Cervical scoliosis and torticollis: a novel skeletal anomaly in broiler chickens

Overview of attention for article published in Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica, October 2019
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
11 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Cervical scoliosis and torticollis: a novel skeletal anomaly in broiler chickens
Published in
Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica, October 2019
DOI 10.1186/s13028-019-0482-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew Olkowski, Chris Wojnarowicz, Boguslaw Olkowski, Bernard Laarveld

Abstract

Among the most prominent health problems marring the global poultry industry for several decades are skeletal abnormalities. The aim of this study was to investigate a recent emergence of a novel form of skeletal deformity affecting cervical spine in broiler chickens. This work presents the natural history of this newly emerging skeletal anomaly along with long term observations of epidemiological trends in commercial broiler flocks, and clinical and pathological features. In distinction from other forms of skeletal deformities commonly reported in broiler chickens, this new form of cervical spine anomaly have been observed in newly hatched chicks and in fully developed embryos that died in the shell. On clinical and post mortem examination this condition presents characteristic features consistent with congenital cervical scoliosis and torticollis (CCST). The pathogenesis of CCST appears to be linked to pathological remodeling of the cervical vertebrae bone associated with excessive activity of osteoclasts. Long term observations indicate that the incidence of CCST showed increasing epidemiological trends over time. More recently CCST has been observed in newly hatched chicks with incidence ranging from 0.1 to > 1%, and in fully developed embryos that failed to hatch about 4 to 5%. The increasing trends in incidence of CCST in commercial broiler flocks are of concern from an economic perspective, and also represent a very specific and important aspect of animal welfare.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 27%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 18%
Professor 1 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 9%
Other 1 9%
Unknown 2 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 27%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 9%
Environmental Science 1 9%
Other 1 9%
Unknown 1 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 November 2019.
All research outputs
#9,322,039
of 16,209,978 outputs
Outputs from Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica
#177
of 585 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#137,735
of 274,351 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,209,978 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 585 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,351 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them