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Hereditary angioedema due to C1 - inhibitor deficiency in Switzerland: clinical characteristics and therapeutic modalities within a cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

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7 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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21 Dimensions

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30 Mendeley
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Title
Hereditary angioedema due to C1 - inhibitor deficiency in Switzerland: clinical characteristics and therapeutic modalities within a cohort study
Published in
Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13023-016-0423-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Urs C. Steiner, Christina Weber-Chrysochoou, Arthur Helbling, Kathrin Scherer, Peter Schmid Grendelmeier, Walter A. Wuillemin

Abstract

Registration of trigger factors, prodromal symptoms, swelling localization, therapeutic behavior and gender-specific differences of the largest cohort of patients with hereditary angioedema due to C1-Inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-HAE) in Switzerland. Questionnaire survey within a cohort study: Consenting eligible patients with diagnosed HAE according to clinical history, physical examination and laboratory results, including plasma values for C1-INH and C4 were selected. To each participant we sent a questionnaire assessing patients' birthday, sex, date of first symptoms and diagnosis, trigger factors, prodromal symptoms, frequency and localization of angioedema, medication use and co-morbidities. Clinical information was collected in each center and then transmitted to the cohort database. Frequencies and distributions were summarized. Associations between gender and trigger factors or prodromal symptoms or localization of angioedema were assessed in multivariate analyses correcting for patients' age. Of 135 patients, data from 104 patients (77 %) were available for analysis. Fifty- four percent were female, mean age at diagnosis was 19.5 years (SD 14.1), Mean age when completing the questionnaire was 44.0 (SD 19.8). More women than men were symptomatic (44/57 vs. 36/47; p = 0.005). This association remained when correcting for age at diagnosis (16.10. 95%CI (5.17 to 26.70); p = 0.004). Swelling episodes ranged between 1 and 136 episodes/year. Swelling was more common among female than among male (-13.15 (95 % CI; -23.10 to -3.22), p = 0.010). Age at diagnosis was inversely associated with the total number of attacks 0.50 (-0.88 to -.011); p = 0.012). One third of patients were on danazol prophylaxis. We found large differences of HAE in male and female both in terms of symptom number and swelling episodes. Women are more affected by intensity and frequency of angioedema episodes than men. Danazol treatment remains widely used as effective prophylaxis despite its side effects. New therapies which selectively influence the hormonal estrogen balance could open new therapeutic options mainly for women and maybe also for men.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 3%
Unknown 29 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 13%
Other 4 13%
Student > Master 4 13%
Student > Bachelor 3 10%
Other 5 17%
Unknown 5 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 43%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 7%
Psychology 2 7%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 5 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 April 2016.
All research outputs
#5,209,068
of 18,940,883 outputs
Outputs from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#654
of 2,029 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#79,789
of 272,845 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#6
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,940,883 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,029 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,845 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.