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Experimental transmission of Babesia microti by Rhipicephalus haemaphysaloides

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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22 Mendeley
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Title
Experimental transmission of Babesia microti by Rhipicephalus haemaphysaloides
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13071-016-1517-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lan-Hua Li, Dan Zhu, Chen-Chen Zhang, Yi Zhang, Xiao-Nong Zhou

Abstract

Human babesiosis is considered an emerging threat in China. Dozens of human infections with Babesia microti have been reported recently, especially in southern China. However, the transmission vectors of this parasite in these areas are not well understood. Rhipicephalus haemaphysaloides, which is one of the dominant tick species in southern China, is a major vector of bovine babesiosis in China. However, whether this tick has the potential to transmit B. microti has not been tested. The present study experimentally investigated the transmission competence of B. microti through R. haemaphysaloides ticks. Larvae and nymphs of R. haemaphysaloides ticks were fed on laboratory mice infected by B. microti. The infection was detected by PCR at 4 weeks post-molting. BALB/c and NOD/SCID mice were infested by nymphs molting from larvae that ingested the blood of infective mice, and blood samples were then analyzed by PCR. Experimental transstadial transmission of R. haemaphysaloides for B. microti was proved in both the larvae to nymph and the nymph to adult transstadial routes. The positive rate of B. microti was 43.8 % in nymphs developed from larvae consumed infected mice and 96.7 % in adults developed from nymphs exposed to positive mice. Among the mice infested by infective nymphs, B. microti was detected in 16.7 % (2/12) of the BALB/c mice and in all of the NOD/SCID (6/6). However, the parasite was not observed to persist beyond more than one molt, and transovarial transmission did not occur. This is the first study to demonstrate that B. microti can be transmitted artificially by R. haemaphysaloides. This tick species might be a potential vector of human babesiosis in southern China, which represents a public health concern.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Uganda 1 5%
Unknown 21 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 23%
Researcher 3 14%
Professor 2 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 5%
Other 4 18%
Unknown 5 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 9%
Environmental Science 1 5%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 5%
Other 4 18%
Unknown 7 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 May 2016.
All research outputs
#2,992,950
of 7,644,999 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#637
of 2,105 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#96,403
of 267,262 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#44
of 180 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,644,999 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 60th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,105 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,262 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 180 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.