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Knowledge, attitudes, and practices of Florida physicians regarding dengue before and after an educational intervention

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Education, April 2016
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3 tweeters

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5 Dimensions

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48 Mendeley
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Title
Knowledge, attitudes, and practices of Florida physicians regarding dengue before and after an educational intervention
Published in
BMC Medical Education, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12909-016-0647-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Susanne Doblecki-Lewis, Aileen Chang, Renee Jiddou-Yaldoo, Kay M. Tomashek, Danielle Stanek, Leena Anil, Paola Lichtenberger

Abstract

Failure to recognize and appropriately manage dengue early in the clinical course may result in late initiation of supportive treatment for severe disease. In Florida, travel-related and autochthonous dengue occur and are likely under-recognized. The objective of this study was to evaluate physician knowledge of dengue and its management before and after an educational intervention in Florida. From 2012-13 we conducted 14 grand-rounds style lectures on dengue clinical management attended by 413 physicians, and analyzed data from the pre- and post-tests. Of those attending, 231 and 220 completed the pre-and post-tests, respectively. Overall, the mean pre-test score for knowledge-based questions was 74.3 and average post-test score was 94.2 %, indicating a mean increase of 19.9 % (P < 0.0001, 95 % CI 17.7-22.4). Reported confidence in dengue recognition and management also increased. Non-US trained physicians and those who had treated more than ten dengue cases performed significantly better in the pre-test. Post-test scores did not differ by subgroup. The train-the-trainer approach with grand-rounds style presentations appear to be an effective intervention to improve knowledge of dengue among physicians.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 48 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 23%
Researcher 5 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 10%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 12 25%
Unknown 8 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 29%
Social Sciences 5 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 8%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 6%
Other 10 21%
Unknown 9 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 May 2016.
All research outputs
#3,959,578
of 7,651,252 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Education
#810
of 1,180 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#145,243
of 267,581 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Education
#51
of 72 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,651,252 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,180 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,581 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 72 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.