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Inter-professional delirium education and care: a qualitative feasibility study of implementing a delirium Smartphone application

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making, April 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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112 Mendeley
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Title
Inter-professional delirium education and care: a qualitative feasibility study of implementing a delirium Smartphone application
Published in
BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12911-016-0288-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Melvyn Zhang, Kathleen Bingham, Karin Kantarovich, Jennifer Laidlaw, David Urbach, Sanjeev Sockalingam, Roger Ho

Abstract

Delirium is a common medical condition with a high prevalence in hospital settings. Effective delirium management requires a multi-component intervention, including the use of Interprofessional teams and evidence-based interventions at the point of care. One vehicle for increasing access of delirium practice tools at the point of care is E-health. There has been a paucity of studies describing the implementation of delirium related clinical application. The purpose of this current study is to acquire users' perceptions of the utility, feasibility and effectiveness of a smartphone application for delirium care in a general surgery unit. In addition, the authors aimed to elucidate the potential challenges with implementing this application. This quantitative study was conducted between January 2015 and June 2015 at the University Health Network, Toronto General Hospital site. Participants met inclusion criteria if they were clinical staff on the General Surgery Unit at the Toronto General Hospital site and had experience caring for patients with delirium. At the conclusion of the 4 weeks after the implementation of the intervention, participants were invited by email to participate in a focus group to discuss their perspectives related to using the delirium application RESULTS: Our findings identified several themes related to the implementation and use of this smartphone application in an acute care clinical setting. These themes will provide clinicians preparing to use a smartphone application to support delirium care with an implementation framework. This study is one of the first to demonstrate the potential utility of a smartphone application for delirium inter-professional education. While this technology does appeal to healthcare professionals, it is important to note potential implementation challenges. Our findings provide insights into these potential barriers and can be used to assist healthcare professionals considering the development and use of an inter-professional clinical care application in their setting.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 112 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 112 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 11%
Researcher 10 9%
Student > Bachelor 10 9%
Student > Postgraduate 7 6%
Other 27 24%
Unknown 30 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 29 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 10%
Psychology 9 8%
Computer Science 6 5%
Social Sciences 4 4%
Other 18 16%
Unknown 35 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 May 2016.
All research outputs
#12,639,173
of 22,867,327 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making
#826
of 1,992 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#132,152
of 298,447 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making
#12
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,867,327 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,992 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,447 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.