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Predicting and preventing ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS): the need for individualized not standardized treatment

Overview of attention for article published in Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, January 2012
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Title
Predicting and preventing ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS): the need for individualized not standardized treatment
Published in
Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, January 2012
DOI 10.1186/1477-7827-10-32
Pubmed ID
Authors

Klaus Fiedler, Diego Ezcurra

Abstract

Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) is the most serious complication of controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) as part of assisted reproductive technologies (ART). While the safety and efficacy of ART is well established, physicians should always be aware of the risk of OHSS in patients undergoing COS, as it can be fatal. This article will briefly present the pathophysiology of OHSS, including the key role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), to provide the foundation for an overview of current techniques for the prevention of OHSS. Risk factors and predictive factors for OHSS will be presented, as recognizing these risk factors and individualizing the COS protocol appropriately is the key to the primary prevention of OHSS, as the benefits and risks of each COS strategy vary among individuals. Individualized COS (iCOS) could effectively eradicate OHSS, and the identification of hormonal, functional and genetic markers of ovarian response will facilitate iCOS. However, if iCOS is not properly applied, various preventive measures can be instituted once COS has begun, including cancelling the cycle, coasting, individualizing the human chorionic gonadotropin trigger dose or using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist (for those using a GnRH antagonist protocol), the use of intravenous fluids at the time of oocyte retrieval, and cryopreserving/vitrifying all embryos for subsequent transfer in an unstimulated cycle. Some of these techniques have been widely adopted, despite the scarcity of data from randomized clinical trials to support their use.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 119 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Korea, Republic of 1 <1%
Unknown 118 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 22 18%
Student > Postgraduate 19 16%
Student > Bachelor 16 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 8%
Other 27 23%
Unknown 12 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 68 57%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 4%
Social Sciences 3 3%
Other 6 5%
Unknown 20 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 April 2012.
All research outputs
#4,189,676
of 5,032,658 outputs
Outputs from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#234
of 301 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#63,609
of 77,951 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#7
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,032,658 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 301 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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