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Cardiometabolic disease risk and HIV status in rural South Africa: establishing a baseline

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, February 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source

Citations

dimensions_citation
58 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
167 Mendeley
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Title
Cardiometabolic disease risk and HIV status in rural South Africa: establishing a baseline
Published in
BMC Public Health, February 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1467-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Samuel J Clark, F Xavier Gómez-Olivé, Brian Houle, Margaret Thorogood, Kerstin Klipstein-Grobusch, Nicole Angotti, Chodziwadziwa Kabudula, Jill Williams, Jane Menken, Stephen Tollman

Abstract

To inform health care and training, resource and research priorities, it is essential to establish how non-communicable disease risk factors vary by HIV-status in high HIV burden areas; and whether long-term anti-retroviral therapy (ART) plays a modifying role. As part of a cohort initiation, we conducted a baseline HIV/cardiometabolic risk factor survey in 2010-2011 using an age-sex stratified random sample of ages 15+ in rural South Africa. We modelled cardiometabolic risk factors and their associations by HIV-status and self-reported ART status for ages 18+ using sex-stratified logistic regression models. Age-standardised HIV prevalence in women was 26% (95% CI 24-28%) and 19% (95% CI 17-21) in men. People with untreated HIV were less likely to have a high waist circumference in both women (OR 0.67; 95% CI 0.52-0.86) and men (OR 0.42; 95% CI 0.22-0.82). Untreated women were more likely to have low HDL and LDL, and treated women high triglycerides. Cardiometabolic risk factors increased with age except low HDL. The prevalence of hypertension was high (40% in women; 30% in men). Sub-Saharan Africa is facing intersecting epidemics of HIV and hypertension. In this setting, around half the adult population require long-term care for at least one of HIV, hypertension or diabetes. Together with the adverse effects that HIV and its treatment have on lipids, this may have serious implications for the South African health care system. Monitoring of the interaction of HIV, ART use, and cardiometabolic disease is needed at both individual and population levels.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 167 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 167 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 32 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 13%
Researcher 18 11%
Other 13 8%
Student > Postgraduate 10 6%
Other 39 23%
Unknown 34 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 47 28%
Social Sciences 23 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 22 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 4%
Other 15 9%
Unknown 43 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2019.
All research outputs
#6,902,994
of 21,291,302 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#7,359
of 13,785 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#99,235
of 279,004 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,291,302 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 13,785 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.7. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,004 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them