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Protocol: a method to study the direct reprogramming of lateral root primordia to fertile shoots

Overview of attention for article published in Plant Methods, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
9 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

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69 Mendeley
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Title
Protocol: a method to study the direct reprogramming of lateral root primordia to fertile shoots
Published in
Plant Methods, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13007-016-0127-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Abdul Kareem, Dhanya Radhakrishnan, Xin Wang, Subhikshaa Bagavathiappan, Zankhana B. Trivedi, Kaoru Sugimoto, Jian Xu, Ari Pekka Mähönen, Kalika Prasad

Abstract

Plants have the remarkable property to elaborate entire body plan from any tissue part. The conversion of lateral root primordium (LRP) to shoot is an ideal method for plant propagation and for plant researchers to understand the mechanism underlying trans-differentiation. Until now, however, a robust method that allows the efficient conversion of LRP to shoot is lacking. This has limited our ability to study the dynamic phases of reprogramming at cellular and molecular levels. Here we present an efficient protocol for the direct conversion of LRP to a complete fertile shoot system. This protocol can be readily applied to the various ecotypes of Arabidopsis. We show that, the conversion process is highly responsive to developmental stages of LRP and changes in external environmental stimuli such as temperature. The entire conversion process can be adequately analyzed by histological and imaging techniques. As a demonstration, using a battery of cell fate specific markers, we show that confocal time-lapse imaging can be employed to uncover the early molecular events, intermediate developmental phases and relative abundance of stem cell regulators during the conversion of LRP to shoot. Our method is highly efficient, independent of genotypes tested and suitable to study the reprogramming of LRP to shoot in intact plants as well as in excised roots.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 69 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 1%
Unknown 68 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 25%
Researcher 13 19%
Student > Master 10 14%
Professor 7 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 6%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 15 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 32 46%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 16 23%
Environmental Science 1 1%
Computer Science 1 1%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 1%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 15 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 August 2016.
All research outputs
#5,304,167
of 22,416,700 outputs
Outputs from Plant Methods
#285
of 1,055 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#72,075
of 281,734 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Plant Methods
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,416,700 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,055 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,734 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them